Planta
Brand, A., Institute of Plant Sciences, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Borovsky, Y., Institute of Plant Sciences, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Meir, S., Department of Plant Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Rogachev, I., Department of Plant Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Aharoni, A., Department of Plant Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Paran, I., Institute of Plant Sciences, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Studies on the genetic control of pigment content in pepper fruit have focused mainly on monogenic mutations leading to changes in fruit color. In addition to the qualitative variation in fruit color, quantitative variation in pigment content and color intensity exists in pepper giving rise to a range of color intensities. However, the genetic basis for this variation is poorly understood, hindering the development of peppers that are rich in these beneficial compounds. In this paper, quantitative variation in pigment content was studied in a cross between a dark-green Capsicum annuum pepper and a light-green C. chinense pepper. Two major pigment content QTLs that control chlorophyll content were identified, pc8. 1 and pc10. 1. The major QTL pc8. 1, also affected carotenoid content in the ripe fruit. However, additional analyses in subsequent generations did not reveal a consistent effect of this QTL on carotenoid content in ripe fruit. Confocal microscopy analyses of green immature fruits of the parents and of near-isogenic lines for pc8. 1 indicated that the QTL exerts its effect via increasing chloroplast compartment size in the dark-green genotypes, predominantly in a fruit-specific manner. Metabolic analyses indicated that in addition to chlorophyll, chloroplast-associated tocopherols and carotenoids are also elevated. Future identification of the genes controlling pigment content QTLs in pepper will provide a better understanding of this important trait and new opportunities for breeding peppers and other Solanaceae species with enhanced nutritional value. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.
פותח על ידי קלירמאש פתרונות בע"מ -
הספר "אוצר וולקני"
אודות
תנאי שימוש
pc8.1, a major QTL for pigment content in pepper fruit, is associated with variation in plastid compartment size
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Brand, A., Institute of Plant Sciences, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Borovsky, Y., Institute of Plant Sciences, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Meir, S., Department of Plant Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Rogachev, I., Department of Plant Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Aharoni, A., Department of Plant Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Paran, I., Institute of Plant Sciences, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
pc8.1, a major QTL for pigment content in pepper fruit, is associated with variation in plastid compartment size
Studies on the genetic control of pigment content in pepper fruit have focused mainly on monogenic mutations leading to changes in fruit color. In addition to the qualitative variation in fruit color, quantitative variation in pigment content and color intensity exists in pepper giving rise to a range of color intensities. However, the genetic basis for this variation is poorly understood, hindering the development of peppers that are rich in these beneficial compounds. In this paper, quantitative variation in pigment content was studied in a cross between a dark-green Capsicum annuum pepper and a light-green C. chinense pepper. Two major pigment content QTLs that control chlorophyll content were identified, pc8. 1 and pc10. 1. The major QTL pc8. 1, also affected carotenoid content in the ripe fruit. However, additional analyses in subsequent generations did not reveal a consistent effect of this QTL on carotenoid content in ripe fruit. Confocal microscopy analyses of green immature fruits of the parents and of near-isogenic lines for pc8. 1 indicated that the QTL exerts its effect via increasing chloroplast compartment size in the dark-green genotypes, predominantly in a fruit-specific manner. Metabolic analyses indicated that in addition to chlorophyll, chloroplast-associated tocopherols and carotenoids are also elevated. Future identification of the genes controlling pigment content QTLs in pepper will provide a better understanding of this important trait and new opportunities for breeding peppers and other Solanaceae species with enhanced nutritional value. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.
Scientific Publication