Water Research
Buras, N., Sherman Center for Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture Station, Dor, Israel
Duek, L., Sherman Center for Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture Station, Dor, Israel
Niv, S., Sherman Center for Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture Station, Dor, Israel
Hepher, B., Sherman Center for Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture Station, Dor, Israel
Sandbank, E., Sherman Center for Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture Station, Dor, Israel
Tilapia, common carp and silver carp were reared in treated domestic wastewater. The most sensitive to this environment was the silver carp, followed by common carp and tilapia. In healthy clean fish, bacteria were not found in the blood or the muscles. They were present in small numbers in various organs and in concentrations of 106-107 g-1 in the digestive tract content. In fish exposed to treated wastewater for the entire growing period, bacteria were found in the muscles. The number of bacteria recovered from various organs ranged between 104-106 g-1 and their concentration in the digestive tract content was 108-109 g-1. The number of bacteria in the pond water determined the presence and concentration of bacteria in the fish. The number of bacteria that caused their appearance in the muscles of fish has been named the "threshold concentration". Considering the public health aspects, fish can be reared in treated wastewater provided the bacteriological quality of the water is compatible with the "threshold concentration" levels of the fish grown in the ponds. The suitability of E. coli (fecal coliform bacteria) as indicators for the bacteriological quality of fish grown in wastewater-fed ponds is examined. © 1987.
פותח על ידי קלירמאש פתרונות בע"מ -
הספר "אוצר וולקני"
אודות
תנאי שימוש
Microbiological aspects of fish grown in treated wastewater
21
Buras, N., Sherman Center for Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture Station, Dor, Israel
Duek, L., Sherman Center for Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture Station, Dor, Israel
Niv, S., Sherman Center for Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture Station, Dor, Israel
Hepher, B., Sherman Center for Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture Station, Dor, Israel
Sandbank, E., Sherman Center for Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture Station, Dor, Israel
Microbiological aspects of fish grown in treated wastewater
Tilapia, common carp and silver carp were reared in treated domestic wastewater. The most sensitive to this environment was the silver carp, followed by common carp and tilapia. In healthy clean fish, bacteria were not found in the blood or the muscles. They were present in small numbers in various organs and in concentrations of 106-107 g-1 in the digestive tract content. In fish exposed to treated wastewater for the entire growing period, bacteria were found in the muscles. The number of bacteria recovered from various organs ranged between 104-106 g-1 and their concentration in the digestive tract content was 108-109 g-1. The number of bacteria in the pond water determined the presence and concentration of bacteria in the fish. The number of bacteria that caused their appearance in the muscles of fish has been named the "threshold concentration". Considering the public health aspects, fish can be reared in treated wastewater provided the bacteriological quality of the water is compatible with the "threshold concentration" levels of the fish grown in the ponds. The suitability of E. coli (fecal coliform bacteria) as indicators for the bacteriological quality of fish grown in wastewater-fed ponds is examined. © 1987.
Scientific Publication