Acta Horticulturae
Grava, A., Inst. of Soils, Water and Environmental. Sci., ARO, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Matan, E., Besor Exp. Station, Southern R and D Network, M P 4, Negev 85400, Israel
Yehezkel, Ch., Besor Exp. Station, Southern R and D Network, M P 4, Negev 85400, Israel
Abitan, A., Besor Exp. Station, Southern R and D Network, M P 4, Negev 85400, Israel
Samuel, D., Besor Exp. Station, Southern R and D Network, M P 4, Negev 85400, Israel
Plaut, Z., Inst. of Soils, Water and Environmental. Sci., ARO, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel, Besor Exp. Station, Southern R and D Network, M P 4, Negev 85400, Israel
Tomatoes were grown in sand in PVC covered greenhouses between September and May for several consecutive years. Plants were fertigated using either saline or fresh (nonsaline) water. The total EC of the fresh water was 2.0-2.3 dS/m and that of the saline water was 7.0-8.0 dS/m (including standard nutrient solution). Experiments were conducted during four years in order to determine the effect of salt concentration and composition, timing and length of period of plant exposure to salinity on plant development, fruit yield and quality. The present report is focused on the three dimensional distribution of salts and water tension in the root zone and on ion uptake and distribution between fruits and vegetative organs throughout the season. The findings reveal that C a concentration in the leaves was approximately 30 folds higher than that in the fruits, while the concentrations of Cl and of N a were only 3-4 folds higher in leaves than in fruits. The concentration of Cl in both fruits and leaves was approximately 8-10 times higher than that of Na. The concentration of Cl in leaves tended to decrease throughout the season, while that of Na was nearly unchanged. The concentration of K in fruits and leaves was the same and changed only slightly throughout the season.
פותח על ידי קלירמאש פתרונות בע"מ -
הספר "אוצר וולקני"
אודות
תנאי שימוש
Ion uptake and distribution in tomato plants grown in sand and irrigated with brackish water
554
Grava, A., Inst. of Soils, Water and Environmental. Sci., ARO, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Matan, E., Besor Exp. Station, Southern R and D Network, M P 4, Negev 85400, Israel
Yehezkel, Ch., Besor Exp. Station, Southern R and D Network, M P 4, Negev 85400, Israel
Abitan, A., Besor Exp. Station, Southern R and D Network, M P 4, Negev 85400, Israel
Samuel, D., Besor Exp. Station, Southern R and D Network, M P 4, Negev 85400, Israel
Plaut, Z., Inst. of Soils, Water and Environmental. Sci., ARO, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel, Besor Exp. Station, Southern R and D Network, M P 4, Negev 85400, Israel
Ion uptake and distribution in tomato plants grown in sand and irrigated with brackish water
Tomatoes were grown in sand in PVC covered greenhouses between September and May for several consecutive years. Plants were fertigated using either saline or fresh (nonsaline) water. The total EC of the fresh water was 2.0-2.3 dS/m and that of the saline water was 7.0-8.0 dS/m (including standard nutrient solution). Experiments were conducted during four years in order to determine the effect of salt concentration and composition, timing and length of period of plant exposure to salinity on plant development, fruit yield and quality. The present report is focused on the three dimensional distribution of salts and water tension in the root zone and on ion uptake and distribution between fruits and vegetative organs throughout the season. The findings reveal that C a concentration in the leaves was approximately 30 folds higher than that in the fruits, while the concentrations of Cl and of N a were only 3-4 folds higher in leaves than in fruits. The concentration of Cl in both fruits and leaves was approximately 8-10 times higher than that of Na. The concentration of Cl in leaves tended to decrease throughout the season, while that of Na was nearly unchanged. The concentration of K in fruits and leaves was the same and changed only slightly throughout the season.
Scientific Publication