Water Resources Research
Shani, U., Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel, Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Ben-Gal, A., Environmental Physics and Irrigation, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, Negev, Israel, Environmental Physics and Irrigation, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, Mobile Post Negev 2 85280, Israel
Tripler, E., Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel, Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Dudley, L.M., Department of Plants, Soils and Biometeorology, Utah State University, Logan, UT, United States, Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State University, III Carraway Bldg., Tallahassee, FL 32306, United States
An accessible solution capable of reliably predicting plant-environmental interrelationships for variable species, climates, soils, and management options is a necessary tool for creating sustainable agriculture and environmental preservation. A mechanism-based analytical solution, the first of its kind that considers multiple environmental variables and their combined effects on plant response, was developed and tested. Water uptake by plants, water and salt leakage below the roots, and yield are calculated by solving for transpiration in a single mathematical expression according to limitations imposed by root zone salinity and water status. Input variables include the quantity and salinity of applied water, terms for plant sensitivity to salinity and to water stress, potential evapotranspiration, and soil hydraulic parameters. Where water was not limiting, regression of predicted versus measured data resulted in r2 = 0.96 with slope of 0.937 and intercept of 0.033 (not different from 1 and 0 at 99% confidence), where irrigation varied and salinity was not limiting the r2 = 0.94 with slope of 0.906 and intercept of 0.044 (not different from 1 and 0 at 99% confidence), where both salinity and water levels varied r2 = 0.94 with slope of 0.966 and intercept of 0.033 (not different from 1 and 0 at 99% confidence). Application of the model for agricultural and environmental management and economic analysis is discussed. For example, a farmer in the Arava in Israel where irrigation water salinity is high (electrical conductivity of 3 dS m-1) cannot expect to reach greater than 70% of the potential yield for a pepper crop with any amount of irrigation. By choosing melon, the farmer can achieve 90% of potential yield with the same quality and quantity of water. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.
פותח על ידי קלירמאש פתרונות בע"מ -
הספר "אוצר וולקני"
אודות
תנאי שימוש
Plant response to the soil environment: An analytical model integrating yield, water, soil type, and salinity
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Shani, U., Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel, Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Ben-Gal, A., Environmental Physics and Irrigation, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, Negev, Israel, Environmental Physics and Irrigation, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, Mobile Post Negev 2 85280, Israel
Tripler, E., Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel, Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Dudley, L.M., Department of Plants, Soils and Biometeorology, Utah State University, Logan, UT, United States, Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States, Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State University, III Carraway Bldg., Tallahassee, FL 32306, United States
Plant response to the soil environment: An analytical model integrating yield, water, soil type, and salinity
An accessible solution capable of reliably predicting plant-environmental interrelationships for variable species, climates, soils, and management options is a necessary tool for creating sustainable agriculture and environmental preservation. A mechanism-based analytical solution, the first of its kind that considers multiple environmental variables and their combined effects on plant response, was developed and tested. Water uptake by plants, water and salt leakage below the roots, and yield are calculated by solving for transpiration in a single mathematical expression according to limitations imposed by root zone salinity and water status. Input variables include the quantity and salinity of applied water, terms for plant sensitivity to salinity and to water stress, potential evapotranspiration, and soil hydraulic parameters. Where water was not limiting, regression of predicted versus measured data resulted in r2 = 0.96 with slope of 0.937 and intercept of 0.033 (not different from 1 and 0 at 99% confidence), where irrigation varied and salinity was not limiting the r2 = 0.94 with slope of 0.906 and intercept of 0.044 (not different from 1 and 0 at 99% confidence), where both salinity and water levels varied r2 = 0.94 with slope of 0.966 and intercept of 0.033 (not different from 1 and 0 at 99% confidence). Application of the model for agricultural and environmental management and economic analysis is discussed. For example, a farmer in the Arava in Israel where irrigation water salinity is high (electrical conductivity of 3 dS m-1) cannot expect to reach greater than 70% of the potential yield for a pepper crop with any amount of irrigation. By choosing melon, the farmer can achieve 90% of potential yield with the same quality and quantity of water. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.
Scientific Publication