Nadler, A., Inst, of Soil, Water, and Environ. Sciences, ARO, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Raveh, E., Gilat Research Center, Mobile Post, Negev 85280, Israel
Yermiyahu, U., Gilat Research Center, Mobile Post, Negev 85280, Israel
Lado, M., Inst, of Soil, Water, and Environ. Sciences, ARO, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Nasser, A., Inst, of Soil, Water, and Environ. Sciences, ARO, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Barak, M., Institute of Agricultural Engineering, ARO, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Green, S., Environmental Group, HortResearch, Private Bag 11-030, Palmerston North, New Zealand
Using time domain reflectometry (TDR), we studied stem water content (θstem), stem electrical conductivity (σstem), and their ratio for 220 d in stressed, installation-cured, living trees of four species. Lysimeter-grown mango (Mangifera indica L.), banana (Musa acuminata Colla), date (Phoenix dactylifera L.), and olive (Olea europaea L.) wete subjected to several types of mild (intensity and duration) water stresses simulating horticultural orchard irrigation practices. This study of living trees was triggered by our previous study accomplished in uncured, thawed, native, cut stem segments. We have confirmed in living trees our earlier findings that θstem reacts sensitively and within minutes to water stress. This response is the main driver of σstem changes, by far exceeding the salinity effect on σstem. Known irrigation rates, half-hourly tree weights from load cells, and frequent sampling of drainage solution for volume and salinity independently confirmed our findings. Relative to θstem, resistivity measurements have lower scatter because θstem-dielectric constant (ε) relationships are exponential and θstem-resistivity relationships are linear. With resistivity, there is no need to match impedances among meter, cable, and probe, implying a larger flexibility in probe geometry, longer cables, and higher accuracy with shorter rods. There is a clear economic advantage in resistivity over ε measurements. The linkage between stem resistivity and water status (designated as the linkage factor) for lysimeter plants, orchard trees, and cut stem segments demonstrates the potential in scheduling irrigation according to plant water needs with an inexpensive, direct, and simple resistivity measurement. © Soil Science Society of America.
פותח על ידי קלירמאש פתרונות בע"מ -
הספר "אוצר וולקני"
אודות
תנאי שימוש
Detecting water stress in trees using stem electrical conductivity measurements
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Nadler, A., Inst, of Soil, Water, and Environ. Sciences, ARO, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Raveh, E., Gilat Research Center, Mobile Post, Negev 85280, Israel
Yermiyahu, U., Gilat Research Center, Mobile Post, Negev 85280, Israel
Lado, M., Inst, of Soil, Water, and Environ. Sciences, ARO, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Nasser, A., Inst, of Soil, Water, and Environ. Sciences, ARO, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Barak, M., Institute of Agricultural Engineering, ARO, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Green, S., Environmental Group, HortResearch, Private Bag 11-030, Palmerston North, New Zealand
Detecting water stress in trees using stem electrical conductivity measurements
Using time domain reflectometry (TDR), we studied stem water content (θstem), stem electrical conductivity (σstem), and their ratio for 220 d in stressed, installation-cured, living trees of four species. Lysimeter-grown mango (Mangifera indica L.), banana (Musa acuminata Colla), date (Phoenix dactylifera L.), and olive (Olea europaea L.) wete subjected to several types of mild (intensity and duration) water stresses simulating horticultural orchard irrigation practices. This study of living trees was triggered by our previous study accomplished in uncured, thawed, native, cut stem segments. We have confirmed in living trees our earlier findings that θstem reacts sensitively and within minutes to water stress. This response is the main driver of σstem changes, by far exceeding the salinity effect on σstem. Known irrigation rates, half-hourly tree weights from load cells, and frequent sampling of drainage solution for volume and salinity independently confirmed our findings. Relative to θstem, resistivity measurements have lower scatter because θstem-dielectric constant (ε) relationships are exponential and θstem-resistivity relationships are linear. With resistivity, there is no need to match impedances among meter, cable, and probe, implying a larger flexibility in probe geometry, longer cables, and higher accuracy with shorter rods. There is a clear economic advantage in resistivity over ε measurements. The linkage between stem resistivity and water status (designated as the linkage factor) for lysimeter plants, orchard trees, and cut stem segments demonstrates the potential in scheduling irrigation according to plant water needs with an inexpensive, direct, and simple resistivity measurement. © Soil Science Society of America.
Scientific Publication