Planta

Hirschberg, J., Department of Genetics, Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904, Israel; Mandolino, G., Research Centre for Cereal and Industrial Crops (CREA-CI), Via di Corticella, Bologna, 133-40128, Italy; Parisi, B., Research Centre for Cereal and Industrial Crops (CREA-CI), Via di Corticella, Bologna, 133-40128, Italy;

Main conclusion: Growth in hot climates selectively alters potato tuber secondary metabolism—such as the anthocyanins, carotenoids, and glycoalkaloids—changing its nutritive value and the composition of health-promoting components. Abstract: Potato breeding for improved nutritional value focuses mainly on increasing the health-promoting carotenoids and anthocyanins, and controlling toxic steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs). Metabolite levels are genetically determined, but developmental, tissue-specific, and environmental cues affect their final content. Transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches were applied to monitor carotenoid, anthocyanin, and SGA metabolite levels and their biosynthetic genes’ expression under heat stress. The studied cultivars differed in tuber flesh carotenoid concentration and peel anthocyanin concentration. Gene expression studies showed heat-induced downregulation of specific genes for SGA, anthocyanin, and carotenoid biosynthesis. KEGG database mapping of the heat transcriptome indicated reduced gene expression for specific metabolic pathways rather than a global heat response. Targeted metabolomics indicated reduced SGA concentration, but anthocyanin pigments concentration remained unchanged, probably due to their stabilization in the vacuole. Total carotenoid level did not change significantly in potato tuber flesh, but their composition did. Results suggest that growth in hot climates selectively alters tuber secondary metabolism, changing its nutritive value and composition of health-promoting components. © 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

פותח על ידי קלירמאש פתרונות בע"מ -
הספר "אוצר וולקני"
אודות
תנאי שימוש
Nutritional value of potato (Solanum tuberosum) in hot climates: anthocyanins, carotenoids, and steroidal glycoalkaloids
249

Hirschberg, J., Department of Genetics, Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904, Israel; Mandolino, G., Research Centre for Cereal and Industrial Crops (CREA-CI), Via di Corticella, Bologna, 133-40128, Italy; Parisi, B., Research Centre for Cereal and Industrial Crops (CREA-CI), Via di Corticella, Bologna, 133-40128, Italy;

Nutritional value of potato (Solanum tuberosum) in hot climates: anthocyanins, carotenoids, and steroidal glycoalkaloids

Main conclusion: Growth in hot climates selectively alters potato tuber secondary metabolism—such as the anthocyanins, carotenoids, and glycoalkaloids—changing its nutritive value and the composition of health-promoting components. Abstract: Potato breeding for improved nutritional value focuses mainly on increasing the health-promoting carotenoids and anthocyanins, and controlling toxic steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs). Metabolite levels are genetically determined, but developmental, tissue-specific, and environmental cues affect their final content. Transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches were applied to monitor carotenoid, anthocyanin, and SGA metabolite levels and their biosynthetic genes’ expression under heat stress. The studied cultivars differed in tuber flesh carotenoid concentration and peel anthocyanin concentration. Gene expression studies showed heat-induced downregulation of specific genes for SGA, anthocyanin, and carotenoid biosynthesis. KEGG database mapping of the heat transcriptome indicated reduced gene expression for specific metabolic pathways rather than a global heat response. Targeted metabolomics indicated reduced SGA concentration, but anthocyanin pigments concentration remained unchanged, probably due to their stabilization in the vacuole. Total carotenoid level did not change significantly in potato tuber flesh, but their composition did. Results suggest that growth in hot climates selectively alters tuber secondary metabolism, changing its nutritive value and composition of health-promoting components. © 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

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