Plant Science

Larry Lerno - Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA; Food Safety and Measurement Facility, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
Susan E.Ebeler - Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.

Girdling is an important horticultural practice that allows increased yields or modulated ripening but not much is known how it affects metabolic processes. Trunk girdling was performed at fruit set using a single-blade knife on two table grape cultivar SUPERIOR SEEDLESS® and SABLE SEEDLESS®. Sampling of berries was carried out 1 or 9 weeks after girdling in 2017 from both cultivars and 7 and 9 weeks after girdling of ‘Sable’ in 2018. As expected, girdling resulted in consistent increase in berry size but total soluble content of mature ‘Superior’ berries was not affected and in ‘Sable’ it was slightly reduced in one of the two seasons examined. One week after girdling, abscisic acid and gibberellin content was higher in fruitlets from girdled vines and genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway were induced in both cultivars. Berry color development of ‘Sable’ measured both by auto-fluorescence and concentration of anthocyanins was reduced upon girdling. In contrast, flavan-3-ol and flavonol content, and total proanthcyanidins (PA) content increased 1.8-fold while the mean degree polymerization of the PA decreased from 26 to 21 upon girdling. Girdling reduced the levels of fatty acid derived volatiles in berries of ‘Superior’ and ‘Sable’. In ‘Sable’, the total terpene level and the level of volatiles released after acid hydrolysis, decreased upon girdling. Overall, our study indicates that girdling can divert metabolic pathways in a manner that may have significant effect on the taste and flavor of grapes.

פותח על ידי קלירמאש פתרונות בע"מ -
הספר "אוצר וולקני"
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תנאי שימוש
Girdling of table grapes at fruit set can divert the phenylpropanoid pathway towards accumulation of proanthocyanidins and change the volatile composition
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Larry Lerno - Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA; Food Safety and Measurement Facility, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
Susan E.Ebeler - Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.

Girdling of table grapes at fruit set can divert the phenylpropanoid pathway towards accumulation of proanthocyanidins and change the volatile composition

Girdling is an important horticultural practice that allows increased yields or modulated ripening but not much is known how it affects metabolic processes. Trunk girdling was performed at fruit set using a single-blade knife on two table grape cultivar SUPERIOR SEEDLESS® and SABLE SEEDLESS®. Sampling of berries was carried out 1 or 9 weeks after girdling in 2017 from both cultivars and 7 and 9 weeks after girdling of ‘Sable’ in 2018. As expected, girdling resulted in consistent increase in berry size but total soluble content of mature ‘Superior’ berries was not affected and in ‘Sable’ it was slightly reduced in one of the two seasons examined. One week after girdling, abscisic acid and gibberellin content was higher in fruitlets from girdled vines and genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway were induced in both cultivars. Berry color development of ‘Sable’ measured both by auto-fluorescence and concentration of anthocyanins was reduced upon girdling. In contrast, flavan-3-ol and flavonol content, and total proanthcyanidins (PA) content increased 1.8-fold while the mean degree polymerization of the PA decreased from 26 to 21 upon girdling. Girdling reduced the levels of fatty acid derived volatiles in berries of ‘Superior’ and ‘Sable’. In ‘Sable’, the total terpene level and the level of volatiles released after acid hydrolysis, decreased upon girdling. Overall, our study indicates that girdling can divert metabolic pathways in a manner that may have significant effect on the taste and flavor of grapes.

Scientific Publication