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The Journal of Protozoology
BLUM, J.J., Department of Physiology and Pathology, Duke University Medical School, Durham, North Carolina, United States
SOMMER, J.R., Department of Physiology and Pathology, Duke University Medical School, Durham, North Carolina, United States
KAHN, V., Department of Physiology and Pathology, Duke University Medical School, Durham, North Carolina, United States
SYNOPSIS. The relationship between Astasia longa and a streptomycin‐bleached strain of Euglena grocilis has been examined by several criteria. The organisms differ in their sensitivity to actinomycin D and 8‐azaguanine in their ability to incorporate C14‐labeled leucine, and in their sensitivity to a new antibiotic called primycin. Euglena forms an induced acid phosphatase when grown in phosphate‐deficient medium, but Astasia does not. On the basis of these and other differences, it is suggested that these two organisms are separate genera. Understanding of cell division in these cells has been increased by discovery of an array of tubular fibrils corresponding to a spindle apparatus in the nucleus of a dividing Astasia. This finding, plus the observation that presumptive pellicle complexes are formed during prophase, clarify the fission mechanisms in these organisms. Copyright © 1965, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved
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Some Biochemical, Cytological, and Morphogenetic Comparisons Between Astasia longa and a Bleached Euglena gracilis
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BLUM, J.J., Department of Physiology and Pathology, Duke University Medical School, Durham, North Carolina, United States
SOMMER, J.R., Department of Physiology and Pathology, Duke University Medical School, Durham, North Carolina, United States
KAHN, V., Department of Physiology and Pathology, Duke University Medical School, Durham, North Carolina, United States
Some Biochemical, Cytological, and Morphogenetic Comparisons Between Astasia longa and a Bleached Euglena gracilis
SYNOPSIS. The relationship between Astasia longa and a streptomycin‐bleached strain of Euglena grocilis has been examined by several criteria. The organisms differ in their sensitivity to actinomycin D and 8‐azaguanine in their ability to incorporate C14‐labeled leucine, and in their sensitivity to a new antibiotic called primycin. Euglena forms an induced acid phosphatase when grown in phosphate‐deficient medium, but Astasia does not. On the basis of these and other differences, it is suggested that these two organisms are separate genera. Understanding of cell division in these cells has been increased by discovery of an array of tubular fibrils corresponding to a spindle apparatus in the nucleus of a dividing Astasia. This finding, plus the observation that presumptive pellicle complexes are formed during prophase, clarify the fission mechanisms in these organisms. Copyright © 1965, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved
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