Advanced Search
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Kliot, A., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel, Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
Kontsedalov, S., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Lebedev, G., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Brumin, M., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Cathrin, P.B., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Marubayashi, J.M., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Skaljac, M., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel, Department of Applied Sciences, Institute for Adriatic Crops and Karst Reclamation, Croatia
Belausov, E., The Institute of Plant Sciences, Volcani Center, Israel
Czosnek, H., Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
Ghanim, M., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a name given to a variety of techniques commonly used for visualizing gene transcripts in eukaryotic cells and can be further modified to visualize other components in the cell such as infection with viruses and bacteria. Spatial localization and visualization of viruses and bacteria during the infection process is an essential step that complements expression profiling experiments such as microarrays and RNAseq in response to different stimuli. Understanding the spatiotemporal infections with these agents complements biological experiments aimed at understanding their interaction with cellular components. Several techniques for visualizing viruses and bacteria such as reporter gene systems or immunohistochemical methods are time-consuming, and some are limited to work with model organisms and involve complex methodologies. FISH that targets RNA or DNA species in the cell is a relatively easy and fast method for studying spatiotemporal localization of genes and for diagnostic purposes. This method can be robust and relatively easy to implement when the protocols employ short hybridizing, commercially-purchased probes, which are not expensive. This is particularly robust when sample preparation, fixation, hybridization, and microscopic visualization do not involve complex steps. Here we describe a protocol for localization of bacteria and viruses in insect and plant tissues. The method is based on simple preparation, fixation, and hybridization of insect whole mounts and dissected organs or hand-made plant sections, with 20 base pairs short DNA probes conjugated to fluorescent dyes on their 5′ or 3′ ends. This protocol has been successfully applied to a number of insect and plant tissues, and can be used to analyze expression of mRNAs or other RNA or DNA species in the cell.
Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) for the localization of viruses and endosymbiotic bacteria in plant and insect tissues - 2014
Kliot, A., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel, Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
Kontsedalov, S., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Lebedev, G., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Brumin, M., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Cathrin, P.B., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Marubayashi, J.M., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Skaljac, M., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel, Department of Applied Sciences, Institute for Adriatic Crops and Karst Reclamation, Croatia
Belausov, E., The Institute of Plant Sciences, Volcani Center, Israel
Czosnek, H., Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
Ghanim, M., Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Israel
Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) for the localization of viruses and endosymbiotic bacteria in plant and insect tissues
Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a name given to a variety of techniques commonly used for visualizing gene transcripts in eukaryotic cells and can be further modified to visualize other components in the cell such as infection with viruses and bacteria. Spatial localization and visualization of viruses and bacteria during the infection process is an essential step that complements expression profiling experiments such as microarrays and RNAseq in response to different stimuli. Understanding the spatiotemporal infections with these agents complements biological experiments aimed at understanding their interaction with cellular components. Several techniques for visualizing viruses and bacteria such as reporter gene systems or immunohistochemical methods are time-consuming, and some are limited to work with model organisms and involve complex methodologies. FISH that targets RNA or DNA species in the cell is a relatively easy and fast method for studying spatiotemporal localization of genes and for diagnostic purposes. This method can be robust and relatively easy to implement when the protocols employ short hybridizing, commercially-purchased probes, which are not expensive. This is particularly robust when sample preparation, fixation, hybridization, and microscopic visualization do not involve complex steps. Here we describe a protocol for localization of bacteria and viruses in insect and plant tissues. The method is based on simple preparation, fixation, and hybridization of insect whole mounts and dissected organs or hand-made plant sections, with 20 base pairs short DNA probes conjugated to fluorescent dyes on their 5′ or 3′ ends. This protocol has been successfully applied to a number of insect and plant tissues, and can be used to analyze expression of mRNAs or other RNA or DNA species in the cell.

Look at the video demonstrating the experiment

Scientific Publication
You may also be interested in