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Journal of Dairy Science
Arieli, A., Department of Animal Science, Fac. Agric., Food Environ. Qual. S., Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Vallimont, J.E., Dept. of Dairy and Animal Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, United States
Aharoni, Y., ARO, Department of Beef Cattle, Newe Yaar Research Center, P.O. Box 1021, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Varga, G.A., Dept. of Dairy and Animal Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, United States
Twenty-seven multiparous Holstein dairy cows were used to evaluate the singular and combined effects of somatotropin and monensin treatments during the late dry period on postpartum metabolism and production. Treatments were 1) control, 2) injection of exogenous bovine somatotropin (bST); 3) total mixed rations top-dressed with 300 mg of monensin/d, and 4) monensin and somatotropin in combination, during the last 28 d before expected parturition. A 500-mg subcutaneous injection of sustained-release somatotropin was administered at d-28 and -14 relative to expected calving. Glucose kinetics was evaluated on d 15 before expected calving date using a tracer dose of 45 mg of U-13C-labeled glucose. Jugular blood was sampled 20 times during 8 h after tracer injection. Intake of DM was 1.9% of BW, and daily feed was supplied in six equal meals before the glucose kinetic assay. The CONSAM simulation program, which assumes a two-compartment model, was used to analyze the glucose 13C enrichment curves with time. Average glucose distribution space, glucose mass, and glucose residence time in compartment 1 were increased in monensin-treated cows and were decreased in bST-treated cows. On the day of the glucose kinetic assay, blood concentrations of glucose, NEFA, and urea were similar among treatments. The changes in glucose pool and distribution space suggest that monensin increases propionate supply and bST facilitates glucose flow into glucose consuming organs. It is concluded that dairy cows might benefit from a combined application of monensin and bST before parturition.
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Monensin and growth hormone effects on glucose metabolism in the prepartum cow
84
Arieli, A., Department of Animal Science, Fac. Agric., Food Environ. Qual. S., Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Vallimont, J.E., Dept. of Dairy and Animal Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, United States
Aharoni, Y., ARO, Department of Beef Cattle, Newe Yaar Research Center, P.O. Box 1021, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Varga, G.A., Dept. of Dairy and Animal Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, United States
Monensin and growth hormone effects on glucose metabolism in the prepartum cow
Twenty-seven multiparous Holstein dairy cows were used to evaluate the singular and combined effects of somatotropin and monensin treatments during the late dry period on postpartum metabolism and production. Treatments were 1) control, 2) injection of exogenous bovine somatotropin (bST); 3) total mixed rations top-dressed with 300 mg of monensin/d, and 4) monensin and somatotropin in combination, during the last 28 d before expected parturition. A 500-mg subcutaneous injection of sustained-release somatotropin was administered at d-28 and -14 relative to expected calving. Glucose kinetics was evaluated on d 15 before expected calving date using a tracer dose of 45 mg of U-13C-labeled glucose. Jugular blood was sampled 20 times during 8 h after tracer injection. Intake of DM was 1.9% of BW, and daily feed was supplied in six equal meals before the glucose kinetic assay. The CONSAM simulation program, which assumes a two-compartment model, was used to analyze the glucose 13C enrichment curves with time. Average glucose distribution space, glucose mass, and glucose residence time in compartment 1 were increased in monensin-treated cows and were decreased in bST-treated cows. On the day of the glucose kinetic assay, blood concentrations of glucose, NEFA, and urea were similar among treatments. The changes in glucose pool and distribution space suggest that monensin increases propionate supply and bST facilitates glucose flow into glucose consuming organs. It is concluded that dairy cows might benefit from a combined application of monensin and bST before parturition.
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