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Weather determined relative sensitivity of plants to salinity: Quantification and simulation
Year:
2013
Source of publication :
Vadose Zone Journal
Authors :
Ben-Gal, Alon
;
.
Yermiyahu, Uri
;
.
Volume :
12
Co-Authors:
Groenveld, T., Wyler Dep. of Dryland Agriculture, French Associates Institute for Agriculture and Biotechnology of Drylands, Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus, 84990, Israel
Ben-Gal, A., Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, Mobile Post Negev 2, 85280, Israel
Yermiyahu, U., Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, Mobile Post Negev 2, 85280, Israel
Lazarovitch, N., Wyler Dep. of Dryland Agriculture, French Associates Institute for Agriculture and Biotechnology of Drylands, Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus, 84990, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
To page:
(
Total pages:
1
)
Abstract:
The amelioration of plant salinity tolerance due to reduction in potential evapotranspiration is a long recognized phenomenon. In spite of this, salinity tolerance of plants is generally calculated from full season, time- and space-averaged response data. We hypothesized that the HYDRUS-1D model could be used to predict dynamic changes in plant salinity tolerance for a greenhouse vegetable crop over a full season and to determine best management practices regarding blending of saline with desalinated water for optimization of yields and water use efficiency (WUE). The specific objectives of the study were to determine dynamic vapor pressure deficit (VDP)-salinity response relationships of bell pepper plants grown in lysimeters and to apply them for hypothetical management scenarios when irrigating with blended desalinated and brackish water under commercial conditions. The transpiration response of bell pepper plants to salinity in the controlled lysimeter experiment was strongly influenced by variations in potential transpiration throughout the season. The plants were relatively tolerant during periods of low VPD and relatively sensitive during periods of high transpiration demand. Data were used to develop salinity response equations as a function of VPD. In a case study for Israel's Arava Valley, transpiration and water productivity of bell peppers could be increased 5% by blending saline and desalinated water such that less saline water was applied during periods of relatively high sensitivity (high VPD) and more during periods of relative tolerance as compared to application of the same total of both sources of water blended at a constant ratio throughout the season. Sensitivity analysis of the dynamic crop response model revealed that such increases in water productivity would be even greater for more salt sensitive crops. © Soil Science Society of America, All rights reserved.
Note:
Related Files :
Bells
Crops
evapotranspiration
lysimeter
one-dimensional modeling
Potential evapotranspiration
saline water
soil surveys
transpiration
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.2136/vzj2012.0180
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
19338
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
16/04/2018 23:28
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
Weather determined relative sensitivity of plants to salinity: Quantification and simulation
12
Groenveld, T., Wyler Dep. of Dryland Agriculture, French Associates Institute for Agriculture and Biotechnology of Drylands, Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus, 84990, Israel
Ben-Gal, A., Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, Mobile Post Negev 2, 85280, Israel
Yermiyahu, U., Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, Mobile Post Negev 2, 85280, Israel
Lazarovitch, N., Wyler Dep. of Dryland Agriculture, French Associates Institute for Agriculture and Biotechnology of Drylands, Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus, 84990, Israel
Weather determined relative sensitivity of plants to salinity: Quantification and simulation
The amelioration of plant salinity tolerance due to reduction in potential evapotranspiration is a long recognized phenomenon. In spite of this, salinity tolerance of plants is generally calculated from full season, time- and space-averaged response data. We hypothesized that the HYDRUS-1D model could be used to predict dynamic changes in plant salinity tolerance for a greenhouse vegetable crop over a full season and to determine best management practices regarding blending of saline with desalinated water for optimization of yields and water use efficiency (WUE). The specific objectives of the study were to determine dynamic vapor pressure deficit (VDP)-salinity response relationships of bell pepper plants grown in lysimeters and to apply them for hypothetical management scenarios when irrigating with blended desalinated and brackish water under commercial conditions. The transpiration response of bell pepper plants to salinity in the controlled lysimeter experiment was strongly influenced by variations in potential transpiration throughout the season. The plants were relatively tolerant during periods of low VPD and relatively sensitive during periods of high transpiration demand. Data were used to develop salinity response equations as a function of VPD. In a case study for Israel's Arava Valley, transpiration and water productivity of bell peppers could be increased 5% by blending saline and desalinated water such that less saline water was applied during periods of relatively high sensitivity (high VPD) and more during periods of relative tolerance as compared to application of the same total of both sources of water blended at a constant ratio throughout the season. Sensitivity analysis of the dynamic crop response model revealed that such increases in water productivity would be even greater for more salt sensitive crops. © Soil Science Society of America, All rights reserved.
Scientific Publication
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