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Mode of action of hot-water dip in reducing decay of lemon fruit
Year:
2001
Authors :
Ben-Yehoshua, Shimshon
;
.
Nafussi, Beatrice
;
.
Peretz, Jacob
;
.
Rodov, Victor
;
.
Volume :
49
Co-Authors:
Nafussi, B., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, ARO, Israel
Ben-Yehoshua, S., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel, Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, ARO, Israel
Rodov, V., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, ARO, Israel
Peretz, J., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, ARO, Israel
Ozer, B.K., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Department of Horticulture, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey
D'Hallewin, G., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, CNR Ist. Fisiol. della Maturazione, Conservazione Frutto Species A.M., Sassari, Italy
Facilitators :
From page:
107
To page:
113
(
Total pages:
7
)
Abstract:
A hot-water dip for 2 min at 52-53 °C prevented decay for at least one week in lemon fruit inoculated with Penicillium digitatum. The mode of action of hot water in reducing decay was investigated by studying the effects of this treatment on the pathogen and on the resistance mechanisms of the fruit. The hot-water dip had a transient inhibitory effect on the pathogen, arresting its growth for 24-48 h. During this lag period, the combined effects of the pathogen and the hot-water dip induced the build up of resistance in the peel. Lignin production in the inoculated sites began within 24 h after inoculation or wounding. When inoculation was followed by the hot-water dip, lignin accumulation continued for a week. Inoculated lemons that were not dipped in hot water rotted, completely within 3 days after inoculation and their lignin content did not rise or even decreased. The scoparone concentration in the inoculated sites of hot dipped fruit started to rise 24 h after treatment and reached a level sufficient to inhibit the pathogen within 2 days after treatment. Parallel to scoparone accumulation, scopoletin was detected in inoculated and heat-treated lemons. Without the pathogen challenge or wounding, heat treatment by itself was not able to induce any of the above-mentioned defensive effects. Our data do not support the involvement of ethanol-extractable aldehydes, associated in the literature with wound gum, or of citral in decay inhibition in hot-water dipped lemons.
Note:
Related Files :
Agriculture
Citrus limon
Food Contamination
food preservation
food quality
food safety
mould
Penicillium
terpenes
water
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1021/jf000700n
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
19573
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
16/04/2018 23:30
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
Mode of action of hot-water dip in reducing decay of lemon fruit
49
Nafussi, B., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, ARO, Israel
Ben-Yehoshua, S., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel, Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, ARO, Israel
Rodov, V., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, ARO, Israel
Peretz, J., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, ARO, Israel
Ozer, B.K., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Department of Horticulture, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey
D'Hallewin, G., Dept. Postharvest Sci. Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, CNR Ist. Fisiol. della Maturazione, Conservazione Frutto Species A.M., Sassari, Italy
Mode of action of hot-water dip in reducing decay of lemon fruit
A hot-water dip for 2 min at 52-53 °C prevented decay for at least one week in lemon fruit inoculated with Penicillium digitatum. The mode of action of hot water in reducing decay was investigated by studying the effects of this treatment on the pathogen and on the resistance mechanisms of the fruit. The hot-water dip had a transient inhibitory effect on the pathogen, arresting its growth for 24-48 h. During this lag period, the combined effects of the pathogen and the hot-water dip induced the build up of resistance in the peel. Lignin production in the inoculated sites began within 24 h after inoculation or wounding. When inoculation was followed by the hot-water dip, lignin accumulation continued for a week. Inoculated lemons that were not dipped in hot water rotted, completely within 3 days after inoculation and their lignin content did not rise or even decreased. The scoparone concentration in the inoculated sites of hot dipped fruit started to rise 24 h after treatment and reached a level sufficient to inhibit the pathogen within 2 days after treatment. Parallel to scoparone accumulation, scopoletin was detected in inoculated and heat-treated lemons. Without the pathogen challenge or wounding, heat treatment by itself was not able to induce any of the above-mentioned defensive effects. Our data do not support the involvement of ethanol-extractable aldehydes, associated in the literature with wound gum, or of citral in decay inhibition in hot-water dipped lemons.
Scientific Publication
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