Advanced Search
Syntax
Search...
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Manage
Community:
אסיף מאגר המחקר החקלאי
Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Pheromonotropic activity of orally administered PBAN and its analogues in Helicoverpa zea
Year:
1994
Source of publication :
Journal of Insect Physiology
Authors :
Rafaeli, Ada
;
.
Volume :
40
Co-Authors:
Raina, A.K., Insect Neurobiology and Hormone Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Building 306, Beltsville, MD 20705, United States
Rafaeli, A., Institute of Technology and Storage of Agricultural Products, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Kingan, T.G., Insect Neurobiology and Hormone Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Building 306, Beltsville, MD 20705, United States
Facilitators :
From page:
393
To page:
397
(
Total pages:
5
)
Abstract:
Helicoverpa zea females do not produce pheromone during the photophase but can be induced to do so by injection of the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN). Based on this fact a bioassay was developed to determine if PBAN and its analogues could cause a pheromonotropic response when fed to the females. Starved photophase females fed PBAN and its penta- and hexapeptide analogues in a sucrose solution did produce significant amounts of pheromone. Activity essentially followed the same pattern as with injected peptides but was significantly lower in the feeding assay. Feeding with a radioactive hexapeptide analogue indicated that up to about 30% radioactivity could be recovered from the haemolymph after 45 min. Haemolymph samples taken at various intervals after feeding PBAN, and analysed by ELISA, indicated a positive correlation between pheromone production and the presence of immunoreactive-PBAN. The results of this study indicate that PBAN and its analogues can cause pheromone production in photophase females after oral administration and that the peptides do traverse the wall of the alimentary canal and appear in haemolymph. © 1994.
Note:
Related Files :
Corn earworm
ELISA
Helicoverpa zea
Oral activity
PBAN
sex pheromone
Zea
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1016/0022-1910(94)90157-0
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
19939
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
16/04/2018 23:32
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
Pheromonotropic activity of orally administered PBAN and its analogues in Helicoverpa zea
40
Raina, A.K., Insect Neurobiology and Hormone Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Building 306, Beltsville, MD 20705, United States
Rafaeli, A., Institute of Technology and Storage of Agricultural Products, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Kingan, T.G., Insect Neurobiology and Hormone Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Building 306, Beltsville, MD 20705, United States
Pheromonotropic activity of orally administered PBAN and its analogues in Helicoverpa zea
Helicoverpa zea females do not produce pheromone during the photophase but can be induced to do so by injection of the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN). Based on this fact a bioassay was developed to determine if PBAN and its analogues could cause a pheromonotropic response when fed to the females. Starved photophase females fed PBAN and its penta- and hexapeptide analogues in a sucrose solution did produce significant amounts of pheromone. Activity essentially followed the same pattern as with injected peptides but was significantly lower in the feeding assay. Feeding with a radioactive hexapeptide analogue indicated that up to about 30% radioactivity could be recovered from the haemolymph after 45 min. Haemolymph samples taken at various intervals after feeding PBAN, and analysed by ELISA, indicated a positive correlation between pheromone production and the presence of immunoreactive-PBAN. The results of this study indicate that PBAN and its analogues can cause pheromone production in photophase females after oral administration and that the peptides do traverse the wall of the alimentary canal and appear in haemolymph. © 1994.
Scientific Publication
נגישות
menu      
You may also be interested in