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Feigin, A., Inst. Soils Water, Agric. Res. Organ., Bet-Dagan, Israel
Bielorai, H., Inst. Soils Water, Agric. Res. Organ., Bet-Dagan, Israel
Shalhevet, J., Inst. Soils Water, Agric. Res. Organ., Bet-Dagan, Israel
Irrigation is one of the means for disposing of wastewater on land. This method is particularly attractive in arid regions, where water shortage is a limiting factor for agriculture. A series of experiments was initiated in 1975 in Israel to study the possible use of secondary sewage effluent as a source of both water and nutrient for some crops. At the same time uptake of minerals by the crop could prevent excessive buildup of toxic elements in the soil. The crops used were Rhodes grass, cotton and sugar beet. Effluent irrigation treatments (quantities and frequencies) vs. fresh water were tested in combination with several levels of fertilizer-N. The amounts of effluents and water applied were within the range normally used for these crops: about 900 mm for Rhodes grass, 330-480 mm for cotton and 380-530 mm for sugar beet. Dry matter production, mineral composition and up-take of the plants were measured. Considerable amounts of N, P, K +, Na +, Ca ++, Mg ++, Cl - and HCO 3 - were applied annually through the effluents. Mineral uptake expressed as a percentage of total quantities applied was high in the case of N, P and K (between 60 and more than 100%, under various experimental conditions) about 10 to 50% of Ca and Mg, with a great variation in Na + and CL - uptake - negligible in the case of cotton and large in the case of sugar beet (approximately 50-60% Na and 30-40% Cl). The amount of mineral uptake was directly related to the yield of plants. Attention was also paid to heavy metals although levels found in the effluent were low.
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The effectiveness of some crops in removing minerals from soils irrigated with sewage effluent
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Feigin, A., Inst. Soils Water, Agric. Res. Organ., Bet-Dagan, Israel
Bielorai, H., Inst. Soils Water, Agric. Res. Organ., Bet-Dagan, Israel
Shalhevet, J., Inst. Soils Water, Agric. Res. Organ., Bet-Dagan, Israel
The effectiveness of some crops in removing minerals from soils irrigated with sewage effluent
Irrigation is one of the means for disposing of wastewater on land. This method is particularly attractive in arid regions, where water shortage is a limiting factor for agriculture. A series of experiments was initiated in 1975 in Israel to study the possible use of secondary sewage effluent as a source of both water and nutrient for some crops. At the same time uptake of minerals by the crop could prevent excessive buildup of toxic elements in the soil. The crops used were Rhodes grass, cotton and sugar beet. Effluent irrigation treatments (quantities and frequencies) vs. fresh water were tested in combination with several levels of fertilizer-N. The amounts of effluents and water applied were within the range normally used for these crops: about 900 mm for Rhodes grass, 330-480 mm for cotton and 380-530 mm for sugar beet. Dry matter production, mineral composition and up-take of the plants were measured. Considerable amounts of N, P, K +, Na +, Ca ++, Mg ++, Cl - and HCO 3 - were applied annually through the effluents. Mineral uptake expressed as a percentage of total quantities applied was high in the case of N, P and K (between 60 and more than 100%, under various experimental conditions) about 10 to 50% of Ca and Mg, with a great variation in Na + and CL - uptake - negligible in the case of cotton and large in the case of sugar beet (approximately 50-60% Na and 30-40% Cl). The amount of mineral uptake was directly related to the yield of plants. Attention was also paid to heavy metals although levels found in the effluent were low.
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