Advanced Search
Syntax
Search...
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Manage
Community:
אסיף מאגר המחקר החקלאי
Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Biogenic soil crusts and soil depth: A long-term case study from the central Negev desert highland
Year:
2010
Source of publication :
Sedimentology
Authors :
Zaady, Eli
;
.
Volume :
57
Co-Authors:
Zaady, E., Department of Natural Resources and Agronomy, Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Mobile Post Negev 85280, Israel
Offer, Z.Y., Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sde-Boker Campus 84990, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
351
To page:
358
(
Total pages:
8
)
Abstract:
Wind-blown soil degradation is a major problem in arid regions. Biogenic soil crust consists of a dense growth of many small organisms covering bare desert soil surfaces in arid regions worldwide. These organisms perform essential services in the ecosystem, for example, soil surface stabilization and carbon and nitrogen fixation. A unique service provided by biogenic crusts is the incorporation of large quantities of deposited atmospheric particles, leading to a significantly enhanced rate of increase in soil depth in windy and arid environments. A long-term study (over 42 months) was conducted to investigate the contribution of a biogenic crust to the accumulation of atmospheric particles in an arid zone. Undisturbed and treated biogenic crusts were studied for their capacity to incorporate deposited particles. Atmospheric particles were found to accumulate on marble dust collectors at a rate of 120 g m-2 year-1 and on sterilized crust at a rate of 208 g m-2 year-1, while the accumulation rate on live, intact crusts was 277 g m-2 year-1, suggesting a soil depth accretion rate on an undisturbed biogenic crust of 10 mm every 33 years. Maintenance of a healthy biogenic crust in dry land environments should, therefore, be a major consideration for improving soil quality and increasing soil depth in arid regions. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 International Association of Sedimentologists.
Note:
Related Files :
accumulation rate
arid region
Degradation
Erosion
Israel
Microphytes
nitrogen fixation
soil degradation
soil erosion
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1111/j.1365-3091.2009.01081.x
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
21506
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
16/04/2018 23:44
Scientific Publication
Biogenic soil crusts and soil depth: A long-term case study from the central Negev desert highland
57
Zaady, E., Department of Natural Resources and Agronomy, Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Mobile Post Negev 85280, Israel
Offer, Z.Y., Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sde-Boker Campus 84990, Israel
Biogenic soil crusts and soil depth: A long-term case study from the central Negev desert highland
Wind-blown soil degradation is a major problem in arid regions. Biogenic soil crust consists of a dense growth of many small organisms covering bare desert soil surfaces in arid regions worldwide. These organisms perform essential services in the ecosystem, for example, soil surface stabilization and carbon and nitrogen fixation. A unique service provided by biogenic crusts is the incorporation of large quantities of deposited atmospheric particles, leading to a significantly enhanced rate of increase in soil depth in windy and arid environments. A long-term study (over 42 months) was conducted to investigate the contribution of a biogenic crust to the accumulation of atmospheric particles in an arid zone. Undisturbed and treated biogenic crusts were studied for their capacity to incorporate deposited particles. Atmospheric particles were found to accumulate on marble dust collectors at a rate of 120 g m-2 year-1 and on sterilized crust at a rate of 208 g m-2 year-1, while the accumulation rate on live, intact crusts was 277 g m-2 year-1, suggesting a soil depth accretion rate on an undisturbed biogenic crust of 10 mm every 33 years. Maintenance of a healthy biogenic crust in dry land environments should, therefore, be a major consideration for improving soil quality and increasing soil depth in arid regions. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 International Association of Sedimentologists.
Scientific Publication
נגישות
menu      
You may also be interested in