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Metabolic Engineering
Hoffmann, T., Biotechnology of Natural Products, Technische Universität München, Liesel-Beckmann-Str. 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
Kurtzer, R., Biotechnology of Natural Products, Technische Universität München, Liesel-Beckmann-Str. 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
Skowranek, K., Biotechnology of Natural Products, Technische Universität München, Liesel-Beckmann-Str. 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
Kießling, P., Biotechnology of Natural Products, Technische Universität München, Liesel-Beckmann-Str. 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
Fridman, E., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Faculty of Agricultural, Food Quality and Environmental Sciences, Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Pichersky, E., Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, 830 N. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1048, United States
Schwab, W., Biotechnology of Natural Products, Technische Universität München, Liesel-Beckmann-Str. 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
Wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca) fruit contains several important phenylpropene aroma compounds such as eugenol, but cultivated varieties are mostly devoid of them. We have redirected the carbon flux in cultivated strawberry (Fragaria× ananassa) fruit from anthocyanin pigment biosynthesis to the production of acetates of hydroxycinnamyl alcohols, which serve as the precursors of the phenylpropenes, by downregulating the strawberry chalcone synthase (CHS) via RNAi-mediated gene silencing and, alternatively, by an antisense CHS construct. Simultaneous heterologous overexpression of a eugenol (EGS) and isoeugenol synthase (IGS) gene in the same cultivated strawberry fruits boosted the formation of eugenol, isoeugenol, and the related phenylpropenes chavicol and anol to concentrations orders of magnitude greater than their odor thresholds. The results show that Fragaria× ananassa still bears a phenylpropene biosynthetic pathway but the carbon flux is primarily directed to the formation of pigments. Thus, partial restoration of wild strawberry flavor in cultivated varieties is feasible by diverting the flavonoid pathway to phenylpropene synthesis through metabolic engineering. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.
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Metabolic engineering in strawberry fruit uncovers a dormant biosynthetic pathway
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Hoffmann, T., Biotechnology of Natural Products, Technische Universität München, Liesel-Beckmann-Str. 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
Kurtzer, R., Biotechnology of Natural Products, Technische Universität München, Liesel-Beckmann-Str. 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
Skowranek, K., Biotechnology of Natural Products, Technische Universität München, Liesel-Beckmann-Str. 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
Kießling, P., Biotechnology of Natural Products, Technische Universität München, Liesel-Beckmann-Str. 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
Fridman, E., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Faculty of Agricultural, Food Quality and Environmental Sciences, Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Pichersky, E., Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, 830 N. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1048, United States
Schwab, W., Biotechnology of Natural Products, Technische Universität München, Liesel-Beckmann-Str. 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
Metabolic engineering in strawberry fruit uncovers a dormant biosynthetic pathway
Wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca) fruit contains several important phenylpropene aroma compounds such as eugenol, but cultivated varieties are mostly devoid of them. We have redirected the carbon flux in cultivated strawberry (Fragaria× ananassa) fruit from anthocyanin pigment biosynthesis to the production of acetates of hydroxycinnamyl alcohols, which serve as the precursors of the phenylpropenes, by downregulating the strawberry chalcone synthase (CHS) via RNAi-mediated gene silencing and, alternatively, by an antisense CHS construct. Simultaneous heterologous overexpression of a eugenol (EGS) and isoeugenol synthase (IGS) gene in the same cultivated strawberry fruits boosted the formation of eugenol, isoeugenol, and the related phenylpropenes chavicol and anol to concentrations orders of magnitude greater than their odor thresholds. The results show that Fragaria× ananassa still bears a phenylpropene biosynthetic pathway but the carbon flux is primarily directed to the formation of pigments. Thus, partial restoration of wild strawberry flavor in cultivated varieties is feasible by diverting the flavonoid pathway to phenylpropene synthesis through metabolic engineering. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.
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