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Interlaboratory comparison of methods to quantify microsclerotia of Verticillium dahliae in soil
Year:
1998
Authors :
Tsror, Leah
;
.
Volume :
64
Co-Authors:
Termorshuizen, A.J., Laboratory of Phytopathology, Wageningen Agricultural University, 6700 EE Wageningen, Netherlands, Laboratory of Phytopathology, Wageningen Agricultural University, P.O. Box 8025, 6700 EE Wageningen, Netherlands
Davis, J.R., Dept. Plant, Soil Entomological Sci., University of Idaho, Research and Extension Center, Aberdeen, ID 83120, United States
Gort, G., Subdepartment of Mathematics, Wageningen Agricultural University, 6703 HA Wageningen, Netherlands
Harris, D.C., Hort. Res. Intl. East Malling, West Malling, Kent ME19 6BJ, United Kingdom
Huisman, O.C., Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States
Lazarovits, G., Pest Management Research Centre, Agriculture and Agrifood Canada, London, Ont. N5V 4T3, Canada
Locke, T., ADAS, Preston Wynne, Hereford HR1 3PG, United Kingdom
Melero Vara, J.M., Consejo Sup. de Invest. Cientificas, Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible, 14080 Cordoba, Spain
Mol, L., Department of Agronomy, Wageningen Agricultural University, 6709 RZ Wageningen, Netherlands
Paplomatas, E.J., Benaki Phytopathological Institute, 145 61 Kifissia, Athens, Greece
Platt, H.W., Plant Pathology Research Station, Charlottetown, PEI. C1A 7M8, Canada
Powelson, M., Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-2902, United States
Rouse, D.I., Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, United States
Rowe, R.C., Department of Plant Pathology, Ohio Agric. R. and D. Center, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 44961-4096, United States
Tsror, L., GILAT Regional Experiment Station, M. P. Negev 2, 85280, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
3846
To page:
3853
(
Total pages:
8
)
Abstract:
In a comparison of different methods for estimating Verticillium dahliae in soil, 14 soil samples were analyzed in a blinded fashion by 13 research groups in seven countries, using their preferred methods. One group analyzed only four samples. Twelve soil samples were naturally infested, and two had known numbers of microsclerotia of V. dahliae added to them. In addition, a control was included to determine whether transport had an effect on the results. Results differed considerably among the research groups. There was a 118-fold difference between the groups with the lowest and highest mean estimates. Results of the other groups were evenly distributed between these extremes. In general, methods based on plating dry soil samples gave higher numbers of V. dahliae than did plating of an aqueous soil suspension. Recovery of V. dahliae from samples with added microsclerotia varied from 0 to 59%. Most of the variability within each analysis was at the petri dish level. The results indicate the necessity to check the performance of detection assays regularly by comparing recoveries with other laboratories, using a common set of soil samples. We conclude that wet plating assays are less accurate than dry plating assays.
Note:
Related Files :
article
bacterium
bacterium isolation
intermethod comparison
laboratory
methodology
soil
Verticillium dahliae
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
21769
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
16/04/2018 23:46
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Scientific Publication
Interlaboratory comparison of methods to quantify microsclerotia of Verticillium dahliae in soil
64
Termorshuizen, A.J., Laboratory of Phytopathology, Wageningen Agricultural University, 6700 EE Wageningen, Netherlands, Laboratory of Phytopathology, Wageningen Agricultural University, P.O. Box 8025, 6700 EE Wageningen, Netherlands
Davis, J.R., Dept. Plant, Soil Entomological Sci., University of Idaho, Research and Extension Center, Aberdeen, ID 83120, United States
Gort, G., Subdepartment of Mathematics, Wageningen Agricultural University, 6703 HA Wageningen, Netherlands
Harris, D.C., Hort. Res. Intl. East Malling, West Malling, Kent ME19 6BJ, United Kingdom
Huisman, O.C., Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States
Lazarovits, G., Pest Management Research Centre, Agriculture and Agrifood Canada, London, Ont. N5V 4T3, Canada
Locke, T., ADAS, Preston Wynne, Hereford HR1 3PG, United Kingdom
Melero Vara, J.M., Consejo Sup. de Invest. Cientificas, Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible, 14080 Cordoba, Spain
Mol, L., Department of Agronomy, Wageningen Agricultural University, 6709 RZ Wageningen, Netherlands
Paplomatas, E.J., Benaki Phytopathological Institute, 145 61 Kifissia, Athens, Greece
Platt, H.W., Plant Pathology Research Station, Charlottetown, PEI. C1A 7M8, Canada
Powelson, M., Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-2902, United States
Rouse, D.I., Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, United States
Rowe, R.C., Department of Plant Pathology, Ohio Agric. R. and D. Center, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 44961-4096, United States
Tsror, L., GILAT Regional Experiment Station, M. P. Negev 2, 85280, Israel
Interlaboratory comparison of methods to quantify microsclerotia of Verticillium dahliae in soil
In a comparison of different methods for estimating Verticillium dahliae in soil, 14 soil samples were analyzed in a blinded fashion by 13 research groups in seven countries, using their preferred methods. One group analyzed only four samples. Twelve soil samples were naturally infested, and two had known numbers of microsclerotia of V. dahliae added to them. In addition, a control was included to determine whether transport had an effect on the results. Results differed considerably among the research groups. There was a 118-fold difference between the groups with the lowest and highest mean estimates. Results of the other groups were evenly distributed between these extremes. In general, methods based on plating dry soil samples gave higher numbers of V. dahliae than did plating of an aqueous soil suspension. Recovery of V. dahliae from samples with added microsclerotia varied from 0 to 59%. Most of the variability within each analysis was at the petri dish level. The results indicate the necessity to check the performance of detection assays regularly by comparing recoveries with other laboratories, using a common set of soil samples. We conclude that wet plating assays are less accurate than dry plating assays.
Scientific Publication
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