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Breeding for resistance to whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses
Year:
2002
Source of publication :
Annals of Applied Biology
Authors :
Lapidot, Moshe
;
.
Volume :
140
Co-Authors:
Lapidot, M., Department of Virology, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Friedmann, M., Department of Plant Genetics, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
109
To page:
127
(
Total pages:
19
)
Abstract:
Geminiviruses comprise a large and diverse family of viruses that infect a wide range of important monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous crop species and cause significant yield losses. The family Geminiviridae is divided into three genera, one of which is Begomovirus. Species of this genus are transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci in a persistent, circulative manner and infect dicotyledonous plants. Severe population outbreaks of B. tabaci are usually accompanied by a high incidence of begomoviruses. During the last two decades, there has been a worldwide spread of the B biotype of B. tabaci, accompanied by the emergence of whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses. Control measures in infected regions are based mainly on limitation of vector populations, using chemicals or physical barriers. However, under conditions of severe whitefly attack, none of these control measures has sufficed to prevent virus spread. Thus, the best way to reduce geminivirus damage is by breeding crops resistant or tolerant to the virus, either by classical breeding or by genetic engineering. A number of begomoviruses have been the subject of much investigation, due to their severe economic impact. This review considers the most severe viral diseases of four major crops (tomato, bean, cassava and cotton). The approaches taken to breed for resistance to these viral diseases should provide a perspective of the issues involved in breeding for begomovirus resistance in crop plants.
Note:
Related Files :
Aleyrodidae
Bemisia tabaci
breeding
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Manihot esculenta
Plant Breeding
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More details
DOI :
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
Review
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
21891
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
16/04/2018 23:47
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Scientific Publication
Breeding for resistance to whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses
140
Lapidot, M., Department of Virology, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Friedmann, M., Department of Plant Genetics, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Breeding for resistance to whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses
Geminiviruses comprise a large and diverse family of viruses that infect a wide range of important monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous crop species and cause significant yield losses. The family Geminiviridae is divided into three genera, one of which is Begomovirus. Species of this genus are transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci in a persistent, circulative manner and infect dicotyledonous plants. Severe population outbreaks of B. tabaci are usually accompanied by a high incidence of begomoviruses. During the last two decades, there has been a worldwide spread of the B biotype of B. tabaci, accompanied by the emergence of whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses. Control measures in infected regions are based mainly on limitation of vector populations, using chemicals or physical barriers. However, under conditions of severe whitefly attack, none of these control measures has sufficed to prevent virus spread. Thus, the best way to reduce geminivirus damage is by breeding crops resistant or tolerant to the virus, either by classical breeding or by genetic engineering. A number of begomoviruses have been the subject of much investigation, due to their severe economic impact. This review considers the most severe viral diseases of four major crops (tomato, bean, cassava and cotton). The approaches taken to breed for resistance to these viral diseases should provide a perspective of the issues involved in breeding for begomovirus resistance in crop plants.
Scientific Publication
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