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Mass balance modeling of arsenic processes in cropland soils
Year:
2005
Authors :
Bar-Yosef, Bnayahu
;
.
Volume :
27
Co-Authors:
Bar-Yosef, B., Agricultural Research Organization, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Chang, A.C., Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, United States
Page, A.L., Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, United States
Facilitators :
From page:
177
To page:
184
(
Total pages:
8
)
Abstract:
This study delineated the mathematical forms for the reactions involved in the mass balance of As in cropland soils. Even mathematically simplified, many model parameters are required to define the reactive processes involved. Example simulations were conducted based on the range of parameter values and initial conditions derived from published literature. The outcomes showed that the As inputs due to fertilizers and irrigation water caused total As content of the root zone to gradually increase over time. The plant uptake and leaching were equally important as pathways for removal of the added As. In turn, the dissolution kinetics of the mineral phase and the distribution coefficient of the adsorbed phase affected the availability of the As for plant uptake and leaching. Parameters based on laboratory-derived data on the dissolution of As mineral phase, mineralization and oxidation of As(III), and the As plant uptake however appeared to overestimate the As transformations in soils. While the development of mathematical model was a straightforward process, its application to realistic situations was hindered by difficulties of defining model parameter values with confidence. Current knowledge on the processes and reactions of As transformation in the soil-plant system is inadequate to calibrate or validate the model. Studies are needed to understand the kinetics of soil As mineral dissolution and precipitation and the dynamics of root growth and As uptake by plant in soils. © Springer 2005.
Note:
Related Files :
Adsorption
Agriculture
biotransformation
chemistry
metabolism
mineral
Organic As
soil chemistry
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1007/s10653-005-0129-0
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
21913
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
16/04/2018 23:47
Scientific Publication
Mass balance modeling of arsenic processes in cropland soils
27
Bar-Yosef, B., Agricultural Research Organization, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Chang, A.C., Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, United States
Page, A.L., Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, United States
Mass balance modeling of arsenic processes in cropland soils
This study delineated the mathematical forms for the reactions involved in the mass balance of As in cropland soils. Even mathematically simplified, many model parameters are required to define the reactive processes involved. Example simulations were conducted based on the range of parameter values and initial conditions derived from published literature. The outcomes showed that the As inputs due to fertilizers and irrigation water caused total As content of the root zone to gradually increase over time. The plant uptake and leaching were equally important as pathways for removal of the added As. In turn, the dissolution kinetics of the mineral phase and the distribution coefficient of the adsorbed phase affected the availability of the As for plant uptake and leaching. Parameters based on laboratory-derived data on the dissolution of As mineral phase, mineralization and oxidation of As(III), and the As plant uptake however appeared to overestimate the As transformations in soils. While the development of mathematical model was a straightforward process, its application to realistic situations was hindered by difficulties of defining model parameter values with confidence. Current knowledge on the processes and reactions of As transformation in the soil-plant system is inadequate to calibrate or validate the model. Studies are needed to understand the kinetics of soil As mineral dissolution and precipitation and the dynamics of root growth and As uptake by plant in soils. © Springer 2005.
Scientific Publication
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