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Demetriades-Shah, T.H., Department of Plant and Soil Science, Alabama A and M University, P.O. Box 1208, Normal, AL 35762, United States
Fuchs, M., Institute of Soils and Water A.R.O., The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Kanemasu, E.T., Department of Agronomy, University of Georgia, College of Agriculture, Georgia Stations, Griffin, GA 30223, United States
Flitcroft, I.D., EROS Data Center, US Geological Survey, Sioux Falls, SD 57198, United States
A strong correlation exists between intercepted solar radiation and crop growth. We cautioned that many derivations of the functional relationship between solar energy and biomass use cumulated data, and therefore have logical and arithmetic weaknesses. We examined the growth response of plants to solar energy by using rates of change, of both interception and growth. Our analysis revealed that measurements of light interception can only establish the relationship a posteriori. Replacing interception data with normalized random numbers did not change the quality of the relations. Several scientists have contested our views. This article reconfirms the general validity of our analysis and of our conclusions, that it is not possible to determine plant growth on the sole basis of intercepted solar energy. © 1994.
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Further discussions on the relationship between cumulated intercepted solar radiation and crop growth
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Demetriades-Shah, T.H., Department of Plant and Soil Science, Alabama A and M University, P.O. Box 1208, Normal, AL 35762, United States
Fuchs, M., Institute of Soils and Water A.R.O., The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Kanemasu, E.T., Department of Agronomy, University of Georgia, College of Agriculture, Georgia Stations, Griffin, GA 30223, United States
Flitcroft, I.D., EROS Data Center, US Geological Survey, Sioux Falls, SD 57198, United States
Further discussions on the relationship between cumulated intercepted solar radiation and crop growth
A strong correlation exists between intercepted solar radiation and crop growth. We cautioned that many derivations of the functional relationship between solar energy and biomass use cumulated data, and therefore have logical and arithmetic weaknesses. We examined the growth response of plants to solar energy by using rates of change, of both interception and growth. Our analysis revealed that measurements of light interception can only establish the relationship a posteriori. Replacing interception data with normalized random numbers did not change the quality of the relations. Several scientists have contested our views. This article reconfirms the general validity of our analysis and of our conclusions, that it is not possible to determine plant growth on the sole basis of intercepted solar energy. © 1994.
Scientific Publication
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