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Constraints on transpiration from an evergreen oak tree in southern Portugal
Year:
2004
Authors :
Cohen, Shabtai
;
.
Volume :
122
Co-Authors:
David, T.S., Estação Florestal Nac., INIAP, Av. da República, 2780-159 Oeiras, Portugal
Ferreira, M.I., Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Tapada da Ajuda, 1394-017 Lisboa, Portugal
Cohen, S., Inst. Soil, Water and Environ. Sci., P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Pereira, J.S., Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Tapada da Ajuda, 1394-017 Lisboa, Portugal
David, J.S., Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Tapada da Ajuda, 1394-017 Lisboa, Portugal
Facilitators :
From page:
193
To page:
205
(
Total pages:
13
)
Abstract:
The experiment took place at a sparse evergreen oak woodland in southern Portugal. Seasonal courses of sap flow, measured in eight points of the stem of a Quercus rotundifolia tree, were monitored during a 2-year period. Plant water relations (predawn and midday leaf water potential, canopy conductance and whole-plant hydraulic conductance) as well as meteorological variables were also measured during the experimental period (May 1996-August 1998). All evidence showed that the plants remained well watered throughout the observation period. The highest transpiration rates occurred during the summer, when only vestigial amounts of rain fell on the shallow soil with a low water storage capacity. This could only be explained by the direct access of the root system to a 13m deep water table. Although there was no increase in water stress during the summer drought, the transpiration rates showed an upper limit well below the atmospheric evaporative demand. This was consistent with the occurrence of a maximum limit for the root water uptake capacity determined by the summer value of whole-plant hydraulic conductance and by stomatal control, which prevented leaf water potential from falling below a cavitation threshold. © 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Note:
Related Files :
Canopy conductance
evergreen forest
Hydraulic conductance
plant water relations
Quercus
sap flow
transpiration
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1016/j.agrformet.2003.09.014
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
22521
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
16/04/2018 23:52
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Scientific Publication
Constraints on transpiration from an evergreen oak tree in southern Portugal
122
David, T.S., Estação Florestal Nac., INIAP, Av. da República, 2780-159 Oeiras, Portugal
Ferreira, M.I., Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Tapada da Ajuda, 1394-017 Lisboa, Portugal
Cohen, S., Inst. Soil, Water and Environ. Sci., P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Pereira, J.S., Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Tapada da Ajuda, 1394-017 Lisboa, Portugal
David, J.S., Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Tapada da Ajuda, 1394-017 Lisboa, Portugal
Constraints on transpiration from an evergreen oak tree in southern Portugal
The experiment took place at a sparse evergreen oak woodland in southern Portugal. Seasonal courses of sap flow, measured in eight points of the stem of a Quercus rotundifolia tree, were monitored during a 2-year period. Plant water relations (predawn and midday leaf water potential, canopy conductance and whole-plant hydraulic conductance) as well as meteorological variables were also measured during the experimental period (May 1996-August 1998). All evidence showed that the plants remained well watered throughout the observation period. The highest transpiration rates occurred during the summer, when only vestigial amounts of rain fell on the shallow soil with a low water storage capacity. This could only be explained by the direct access of the root system to a 13m deep water table. Although there was no increase in water stress during the summer drought, the transpiration rates showed an upper limit well below the atmospheric evaporative demand. This was consistent with the occurrence of a maximum limit for the root water uptake capacity determined by the summer value of whole-plant hydraulic conductance and by stomatal control, which prevented leaf water potential from falling below a cavitation threshold. © 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Scientific Publication
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