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Glasser, T.A., Ramat Hanadiv Nature Park, P.O. Box 325, Zichron Ya'akov, 30900, Israel
Landau, S.Y., Department of Natural Resources and Agronomy, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Ungar, E., Department of Natural Resources and Agronomy, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Muklada, H., Department of Natural Resources and Agronomy, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Perevolotsky, A., Department of Natural Resources and Agronomy, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
In May, 2002 fourteen Damascus goats were bought and held at the Ramat-Hanadiv Nature Park on Mt. Carmel, in central Israel. The main purpose of purchasing the goats was to collect scientific information regarding grazing behaviour of different goat breeds and seasons and apply it in the management of the nature park. The research aimed at bridging the agricultural and ecological aspects of grazing in Mediterranean shrubland and reconciling the needs of both farmers and landscape managers. Fecal NIRS calibrations were developed using the MPLS routine of the Win-ISI II software in order to determine dietary quality and botanical composition of free-grazing goats' diets. Reference values for calibration were obtained by a NIRS-oriented observation method that combined focal observation, digital recording and computerized 'reconstruction' of the diet. Further on, the equations were used for determining dietary composition of three goat breeds (Damascus, Boer and Mamber) in different seasons. These data were implemented in the context of a yearly grazing program at the park. Due to the relatively poor results of the Boer goats, they were excluded and the herd has expanded (to 150 head) with Mamber and Damascus goats. The herd forages daily at specific locations in the park with specific management goals, such as suppression of P. lentiscus (approx. 20% tannins) or consumption of forest understory vegetation. Most scientific results are implemented in the park and herd management. The herd serves as a semi-commercial herd, since milk and cheese are produced, as well as for agro-tourism activities.

In: "Animal farming and environmental interactions in the Mediterranean region”. Part 2

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Goat farming and landscape management: From controlled research to controlled grazing
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Glasser, T.A., Ramat Hanadiv Nature Park, P.O. Box 325, Zichron Ya'akov, 30900, Israel
Landau, S.Y., Department of Natural Resources and Agronomy, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Ungar, E., Department of Natural Resources and Agronomy, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Muklada, H., Department of Natural Resources and Agronomy, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Perevolotsky, A., Department of Natural Resources and Agronomy, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Goat farming and landscape management: From controlled research to controlled grazing
In May, 2002 fourteen Damascus goats were bought and held at the Ramat-Hanadiv Nature Park on Mt. Carmel, in central Israel. The main purpose of purchasing the goats was to collect scientific information regarding grazing behaviour of different goat breeds and seasons and apply it in the management of the nature park. The research aimed at bridging the agricultural and ecological aspects of grazing in Mediterranean shrubland and reconciling the needs of both farmers and landscape managers. Fecal NIRS calibrations were developed using the MPLS routine of the Win-ISI II software in order to determine dietary quality and botanical composition of free-grazing goats' diets. Reference values for calibration were obtained by a NIRS-oriented observation method that combined focal observation, digital recording and computerized 'reconstruction' of the diet. Further on, the equations were used for determining dietary composition of three goat breeds (Damascus, Boer and Mamber) in different seasons. These data were implemented in the context of a yearly grazing program at the park. Due to the relatively poor results of the Boer goats, they were excluded and the herd has expanded (to 150 head) with Mamber and Damascus goats. The herd forages daily at specific locations in the park with specific management goals, such as suppression of P. lentiscus (approx. 20% tannins) or consumption of forest understory vegetation. Most scientific results are implemented in the park and herd management. The herd serves as a semi-commercial herd, since milk and cheese are produced, as well as for agro-tourism activities.

In: "Animal farming and environmental interactions in the Mediterranean region”. Part 2

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