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אסיף מאגר המחקר החקלאי
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Characterization of resistance in chickpea to crenate broomrape (Orobanche crenata)
Year:
2003
Source of publication :
Weed Science
Authors :
Joel, Daniel M.
;
.
Volume :
51
Co-Authors:
Rubiales, D., Instituto Agricultura Sostenible, Consejo Superior Investigaciones Cientificas, Apdo. 4084, E-14080 Córdoba, Spain
Pérez-De-Luque, A., Instituto Agricultura Sostenible, Consejo Superior Investigaciones Cientificas, Apdo. 4084, E-14080 Córdoba, Spain
Joel, D.M., Department of Weed Research, Newe-Ya'ar Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, P.O. Box 1021, Ramat-Yishay 30095, Israel
Alcántara, C., CIFA Alameda del Obispo, Apdo. 4240, E-14080 Córdoba, Spain
Sillero, J.C., CIFA Alameda del Obispo, Apdo. 4240, E-14080 Córdoba, Spain
Facilitators :
From page:
702
To page:
707
(
Total pages:
6
)
Abstract:
Crenate broomrape is a major constraint for legume production in Mediterranean and East Asian countries. Resistance to this parasitic weed is scarce in many legumes but is common in chickpea germ plasm. A detailed in vitro study has shown that resistance in chickpea is the result of the combination of at least two mechanisms. First, and most importantly, the two chickpea lines studied have been identified with low rates of stimulant production. Once germination is induced by exogenous applications of the synthetic germination stimulant GR24, thus overcoming the primary resistance mechanism in these lines, a second resistance mechanism is apparent. This is evidenced by a darkening of host cell tissue in contact with the broomrape radicle, leading to failure of establishment, which was frequently observed in the chickpea accessions. Anatomical studies have shown that this apparently "hypersensitive" response does not correspond with the death of host cells in contact with the parasite cells but corresponds to blocking and death of the penetration structures of the parasite.
Note:
Related Files :
Cicer arietinum
Far East
germination
Mediterranean Region
Mediterranean Sea
Orobanche
Orobanche crenata
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1614/P2002-151
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
22818
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
16/04/2018 23:54
Scientific Publication
Characterization of resistance in chickpea to crenate broomrape (Orobanche crenata)
51
Rubiales, D., Instituto Agricultura Sostenible, Consejo Superior Investigaciones Cientificas, Apdo. 4084, E-14080 Córdoba, Spain
Pérez-De-Luque, A., Instituto Agricultura Sostenible, Consejo Superior Investigaciones Cientificas, Apdo. 4084, E-14080 Córdoba, Spain
Joel, D.M., Department of Weed Research, Newe-Ya'ar Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, P.O. Box 1021, Ramat-Yishay 30095, Israel
Alcántara, C., CIFA Alameda del Obispo, Apdo. 4240, E-14080 Córdoba, Spain
Sillero, J.C., CIFA Alameda del Obispo, Apdo. 4240, E-14080 Córdoba, Spain
Characterization of resistance in chickpea to crenate broomrape (Orobanche crenata)
Crenate broomrape is a major constraint for legume production in Mediterranean and East Asian countries. Resistance to this parasitic weed is scarce in many legumes but is common in chickpea germ plasm. A detailed in vitro study has shown that resistance in chickpea is the result of the combination of at least two mechanisms. First, and most importantly, the two chickpea lines studied have been identified with low rates of stimulant production. Once germination is induced by exogenous applications of the synthetic germination stimulant GR24, thus overcoming the primary resistance mechanism in these lines, a second resistance mechanism is apparent. This is evidenced by a darkening of host cell tissue in contact with the broomrape radicle, leading to failure of establishment, which was frequently observed in the chickpea accessions. Anatomical studies have shown that this apparently "hypersensitive" response does not correspond with the death of host cells in contact with the parasite cells but corresponds to blocking and death of the penetration structures of the parasite.
Scientific Publication
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