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Interactions between developing Citrus fruits and their supportive vascular system
Year:
1995
Source of publication :
Annals of Botany
Authors :
Erner, Yair
;
.
Volume :
76
Co-Authors:
Bustan, A., Kennedy-Leigh Centre for Horticultural Research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100, Israel
Erner, Y., Institue of Horticulture, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet-Dagan, 50250, Israel
Goldschmidt, E.E., Kennedy-Leigh Centre for Horticultural Research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
657
To page:
666
(
Total pages:
10
)
Abstract:
The developing fruit is a strong sink, which demands large amounts of assimilates. A correlation between grapefruit (Citrus Paradisi Macf., var. Marsh seedless) fruit size and its pedicel cross sectional area (CSA) can be demonstrated, suggesting a close interaction between them. The presence of fruits seems to determine the developmental pattern of the vascular tissues within the branches on which the fruits are borne. The pedicel normally terminates its diametric growth prior to the linear phase of fruit growth. Fruit thinning (90%) and trunk girdling, performed in order to minimize carbohydrate limitations, result in dramatic increases in fruit growth rate and pedicel CSA. Partial girdling of the pedicel causes a transient decrease in fruit growth. An increase in specific mass transport (SMT) through the existing vascular routes is the immediate response, due to the instantaneous upsurge of carbohydrate supply to individual fruit. Nevertheless, the rapid development of new vascular tissues has been the major factor responsible for the long term enhancement, or recovery, of fruit growth, suggesting that limitation in transport capacity does occur. The cause and effect relationships between fruit and vascular development are discussed. © 1995 Annals of Botany Company.
Note:
Related Files :
Carbohydrate availability
Citrus spp.
fruit growth
Sink
Source
Specific mass transport (SMT)
Transport limitation
Vascular development
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1006/anbo.1995.1144
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
23656
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:01
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
Interactions between developing Citrus fruits and their supportive vascular system
76
Bustan, A., Kennedy-Leigh Centre for Horticultural Research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100, Israel
Erner, Y., Institue of Horticulture, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet-Dagan, 50250, Israel
Goldschmidt, E.E., Kennedy-Leigh Centre for Horticultural Research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100, Israel
Interactions between developing Citrus fruits and their supportive vascular system
The developing fruit is a strong sink, which demands large amounts of assimilates. A correlation between grapefruit (Citrus Paradisi Macf., var. Marsh seedless) fruit size and its pedicel cross sectional area (CSA) can be demonstrated, suggesting a close interaction between them. The presence of fruits seems to determine the developmental pattern of the vascular tissues within the branches on which the fruits are borne. The pedicel normally terminates its diametric growth prior to the linear phase of fruit growth. Fruit thinning (90%) and trunk girdling, performed in order to minimize carbohydrate limitations, result in dramatic increases in fruit growth rate and pedicel CSA. Partial girdling of the pedicel causes a transient decrease in fruit growth. An increase in specific mass transport (SMT) through the existing vascular routes is the immediate response, due to the instantaneous upsurge of carbohydrate supply to individual fruit. Nevertheless, the rapid development of new vascular tissues has been the major factor responsible for the long term enhancement, or recovery, of fruit growth, suggesting that limitation in transport capacity does occur. The cause and effect relationships between fruit and vascular development are discussed. © 1995 Annals of Botany Company.
Scientific Publication
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