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Characterization of growth and development of male British United turkeys.
Year:
1991
Source of publication :
Poultry Science
Authors :
Bartov, Ido
;
.
Hurvitz, Shmuel (Animal science)
;
.
Plavnik, Isaak
;
.
Talpaz, Hovav
;
.
Volume :
70
Co-Authors:
Hurwitz, S., Institute of Animal Science, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Talpaz, H., Institute of Animal Science, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Bartov, I., Institute of Animal Science, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Plavnik, I., Institute of Animal Science, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Facilitators :
From page:
2419
To page:
2424
(
Total pages:
6
)
Abstract:
Body weight and the size of various organs (tibia, pectoral muscle, leg muscle, liver, spleen, and testes) were monitored in growing male turkeys (British United Turkeys) in an effort to characterize their growth pattern. The results were fitted with either a single- or a double-component Gompertz equation, describing single and diphasic growth patterns, respectively, using an iterative nonlinear estimation algorithm. The diphasic model with an early and a late growth component provided a better description of the body weight function than the single-phase model. The start of sexual maturation, evidenced by testicular development, marked the transition age between the early and the late phases of growth. A single-component Gompertz equation was sufficient to describe growth of various individual organs. Growth of bone and liver appeared to follow the early growth component, whereas the path of muscle development appeared to be closer to the later growth component. The results suggest that the diphasic growth behavior of male turkeys is caused by a differential growth rate of various organs, rather than by a periodicity in the overall growth rate.
Note:
Related Files :
Animal
breeding
Growth, Development and Aging
liver
Male
Models, Biological
testis
tibia
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
Article number:
0
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
23859
Last updated date:
21/08/2022 07:45
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:03
Scientific Publication
Characterization of growth and development of male British United turkeys.
70
Hurwitz, S., Institute of Animal Science, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Talpaz, H., Institute of Animal Science, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Bartov, I., Institute of Animal Science, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Plavnik, I., Institute of Animal Science, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Characterization of growth and development of male British United turkeys.
Body weight and the size of various organs (tibia, pectoral muscle, leg muscle, liver, spleen, and testes) were monitored in growing male turkeys (British United Turkeys) in an effort to characterize their growth pattern. The results were fitted with either a single- or a double-component Gompertz equation, describing single and diphasic growth patterns, respectively, using an iterative nonlinear estimation algorithm. The diphasic model with an early and a late growth component provided a better description of the body weight function than the single-phase model. The start of sexual maturation, evidenced by testicular development, marked the transition age between the early and the late phases of growth. A single-component Gompertz equation was sufficient to describe growth of various individual organs. Growth of bone and liver appeared to follow the early growth component, whereas the path of muscle development appeared to be closer to the later growth component. The results suggest that the diphasic growth behavior of male turkeys is caused by a differential growth rate of various organs, rather than by a periodicity in the overall growth rate.
Scientific Publication
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