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Acta Horticulturae
Elad, Y., Dept. of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Fogel, M., Dept. of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
David, D.R., Dept. of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Messika, Y., Dept. of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Jacob, D., Dept. of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Silverman, D., Extension Service, Ministry of Agriculture, Israel
Shapiro, D., Extension Service, Ministry of Agriculture, Israel
Adler, U., Plant Production Council, Israel
Esquira, I., Plant Production Council, Israel
Yitzhak, S., Eden Station, Emek Hamaayanot R and D, Israel
Deko, T., Eden Station, Emek Hamaayanot R and D, Israel
Harary, D., Zohar Station, Central and North Arava R and D, Israel
Maduel, A., Zohar Station, Central and North Arava R and D, Israel
Pressman, E., Plant Sciences Institute, Volcani Center, Israel
A series of experiments were carried out to identify potential climatemanagement techniques for the suppression of humidity-promoted and powdery mildew diseases in greenhouse-grown sweet pepper, tomato and sweet basil. Elevated daytime temperatures were obtained by closing the side walls of the greenhouses. When sweet-pepper greenhouses were closed, the temperatures inside these structures reached 35°C and we observed significant suppression of Leveillula taurica (anamorph: Oidiopsis sicula). When commercial-like greenhouses were kept closed during autumn and winter, the temperatures inside these greenhouses reached 27-34°C and we observed season-long suppression of tomato powdery mildew (Oidium neolycopersici). Severe epidemics developed in aerated greenhouses maintained according to the common practice (control). The combination of dayheating with applications of disease control agents, such as plant extracts, biocontrol agents and sulfur, improved the control of powdery mildew diseases in both sweet pepper and tomato. Temperatures in polyethylene-covered sweet basil greenhouses that were kept closed for 6 h each day reached 42°C during the winter period. The incidence of gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) in these greenhouses was significantly reduced and basil yields were increased. A significant negative correlation was observed between the duration of temperatures above 30°C and the incidence of gray mold. The suppressive effects of high daytime temperatures on the examined pathosystems can be attributed to a direct effect of temperature on the pathogen inocula, as well as an indirect effect involving the induction of resistance in the host plants. It should be noted that partial aeration to release humidity is essential in daytime-heated greenhouses, in order to prevent outbreaks of diseases that thrive under humid conditions. In tomato greenhouses, additional measures were taken to ensure pollination and fruit set, processes that are negatively affected by high temperatures.
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Daytime solar heat treatment for the suppression of foliar plant pathogens in polyethylene-covered greenhouses
1015
Elad, Y., Dept. of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Fogel, M., Dept. of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
David, D.R., Dept. of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Messika, Y., Dept. of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Jacob, D., Dept. of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Silverman, D., Extension Service, Ministry of Agriculture, Israel
Shapiro, D., Extension Service, Ministry of Agriculture, Israel
Adler, U., Plant Production Council, Israel
Esquira, I., Plant Production Council, Israel
Yitzhak, S., Eden Station, Emek Hamaayanot R and D, Israel
Deko, T., Eden Station, Emek Hamaayanot R and D, Israel
Harary, D., Zohar Station, Central and North Arava R and D, Israel
Maduel, A., Zohar Station, Central and North Arava R and D, Israel
Pressman, E., Plant Sciences Institute, Volcani Center, Israel
Daytime solar heat treatment for the suppression of foliar plant pathogens in polyethylene-covered greenhouses
A series of experiments were carried out to identify potential climatemanagement techniques for the suppression of humidity-promoted and powdery mildew diseases in greenhouse-grown sweet pepper, tomato and sweet basil. Elevated daytime temperatures were obtained by closing the side walls of the greenhouses. When sweet-pepper greenhouses were closed, the temperatures inside these structures reached 35°C and we observed significant suppression of Leveillula taurica (anamorph: Oidiopsis sicula). When commercial-like greenhouses were kept closed during autumn and winter, the temperatures inside these greenhouses reached 27-34°C and we observed season-long suppression of tomato powdery mildew (Oidium neolycopersici). Severe epidemics developed in aerated greenhouses maintained according to the common practice (control). The combination of dayheating with applications of disease control agents, such as plant extracts, biocontrol agents and sulfur, improved the control of powdery mildew diseases in both sweet pepper and tomato. Temperatures in polyethylene-covered sweet basil greenhouses that were kept closed for 6 h each day reached 42°C during the winter period. The incidence of gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) in these greenhouses was significantly reduced and basil yields were increased. A significant negative correlation was observed between the duration of temperatures above 30°C and the incidence of gray mold. The suppressive effects of high daytime temperatures on the examined pathosystems can be attributed to a direct effect of temperature on the pathogen inocula, as well as an indirect effect involving the induction of resistance in the host plants. It should be noted that partial aeration to release humidity is essential in daytime-heated greenhouses, in order to prevent outbreaks of diseases that thrive under humid conditions. In tomato greenhouses, additional measures were taken to ensure pollination and fruit set, processes that are negatively affected by high temperatures.
Scientific Publication
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