Chandrasekhar, K., Department of Vegetables and Field Crops, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO) – the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Nashef, K., Department of Vegetables and Field Crops, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO) – the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Ben-David, R., Department of Vegetables and Field Crops, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO) – the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
During a long evolutionary history across a range of environmental conditions in the Near East Fertile Crescent, wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. dicoccoides) has accumulated a wealth of genetic diversity and adaptations to multiple biotic and abiotic stress conditions. The joint effects of the domestication and subsequent selection in man-made agro-ecosystems have considerably reduced the genetic variation in cultivated crop species as compared to their wild progenitors. The wild emmer gene pool harbors a rich allelic repertoire for improving numerous agronomically important traits. A set of advanced wild emmer wheat introgression lines (ILs) was previously established on a bread wheat genetic background. It combines genetic diversity from the wild progenitor as well as the genetic background of the cultigen. Based on field evaluations, the set of ILs (divided hierarchically into different families based on the genetic background) has exhibited high phenotypic variance in agronomically important traits. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) have shown that the effect of the hierarchical genetic factors was significant in the vast majority of the traits. Similarly, characterizations by molecular markers of known traits have shown that the genetic profile differs between ILs from different genetic backgrounds. Multivariate principal component analysis has revealed interesting associations between vegetative and reproductive traits and illustrated the impact of some of these traits on ILs distribution in the PC1 and PC2. The exploitation of the wild emmer wheat ILs as a tool for reintroduction of alleles that were lost during domestication and possible implications for wheat breeding are discussed. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Agronomic and genetic characterization of wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. dicoccoides) introgression lines in a bread wheat genetic background
64
Chandrasekhar, K., Department of Vegetables and Field Crops, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO) – the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Nashef, K., Department of Vegetables and Field Crops, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO) – the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Ben-David, R., Department of Vegetables and Field Crops, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO) – the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Agronomic and genetic characterization of wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. dicoccoides) introgression lines in a bread wheat genetic background
During a long evolutionary history across a range of environmental conditions in the Near East Fertile Crescent, wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. dicoccoides) has accumulated a wealth of genetic diversity and adaptations to multiple biotic and abiotic stress conditions. The joint effects of the domestication and subsequent selection in man-made agro-ecosystems have considerably reduced the genetic variation in cultivated crop species as compared to their wild progenitors. The wild emmer gene pool harbors a rich allelic repertoire for improving numerous agronomically important traits. A set of advanced wild emmer wheat introgression lines (ILs) was previously established on a bread wheat genetic background. It combines genetic diversity from the wild progenitor as well as the genetic background of the cultigen. Based on field evaluations, the set of ILs (divided hierarchically into different families based on the genetic background) has exhibited high phenotypic variance in agronomically important traits. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) have shown that the effect of the hierarchical genetic factors was significant in the vast majority of the traits. Similarly, characterizations by molecular markers of known traits have shown that the genetic profile differs between ILs from different genetic backgrounds. Multivariate principal component analysis has revealed interesting associations between vegetative and reproductive traits and illustrated the impact of some of these traits on ILs distribution in the PC1 and PC2. The exploitation of the wild emmer wheat ILs as a tool for reintroduction of alleles that were lost during domestication and possible implications for wheat breeding are discussed. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Scientific Publication