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Soil and Tillage Research
Stibbe, E., Agricultural University, Wageningen, Netherlands
Terpstra, R., Agricultural University, Wageningen, Netherlands
Kouwenhoven, J.K., Agricultural University, Wageningen, Netherlands
On light sandy soils in the eastern and southern part of The Netherlands late spring ploughing has become a wide-spread practice for growing silage corn on dairy farms with arable acreage. No consensus exists about the desirability of a loose or more compacted seedbed with respect to seedling establishment and final yield when planting is followed by unstable weather. In a field experiment, three types of seedbed were obtained by (1) early spring ploughing with natural settling of the tilled layer ('moderately compact'); (2) late spring ploughing ('loose') and (3) late spring ploughing with surface compaction added ('compact'). Depth of planting, as affected by bulk density of the seedbed, and delayed seedling emergence, as affected by a cool, wet period, both influenced the final plant population. Though early growth of seedlings was better on a loose seedbed, no significant differences in final dry matter yield between the three tillage practices could be found. In a side study, plant rows were compacted after planting, resulting in a reduced plant number and a lower dry matter yield. Suggestions are given for further research to obtain more information with respect to tillage practices and seedbed conditions required for successful growing of silage corn on light sandy soils. © 1980.
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Effect of spring tillage on seedbed characteristics, plant establishment and yield of silage corn on a light sandy soil
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Stibbe, E., Agricultural University, Wageningen, Netherlands
Terpstra, R., Agricultural University, Wageningen, Netherlands
Kouwenhoven, J.K., Agricultural University, Wageningen, Netherlands
Effect of spring tillage on seedbed characteristics, plant establishment and yield of silage corn on a light sandy soil
On light sandy soils in the eastern and southern part of The Netherlands late spring ploughing has become a wide-spread practice for growing silage corn on dairy farms with arable acreage. No consensus exists about the desirability of a loose or more compacted seedbed with respect to seedling establishment and final yield when planting is followed by unstable weather. In a field experiment, three types of seedbed were obtained by (1) early spring ploughing with natural settling of the tilled layer ('moderately compact'); (2) late spring ploughing ('loose') and (3) late spring ploughing with surface compaction added ('compact'). Depth of planting, as affected by bulk density of the seedbed, and delayed seedling emergence, as affected by a cool, wet period, both influenced the final plant population. Though early growth of seedlings was better on a loose seedbed, no significant differences in final dry matter yield between the three tillage practices could be found. In a side study, plant rows were compacted after planting, resulting in a reduced plant number and a lower dry matter yield. Suggestions are given for further research to obtain more information with respect to tillage practices and seedbed conditions required for successful growing of silage corn on light sandy soils. © 1980.
Scientific Publication