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Journal of Dairy Science
Moallem, U., Department of Dairy Cattle, Institute of Animal Sciences, Volcani Center, PO Box 6, Bet-Dagan, 50250, Israel
Vyas, D., Department of Animal and Avian Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park 20742, United States
Teter, B.B., Department of Animal and Avian Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park 20742, United States
Delmonte, P., Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration, College Park, MD 20742, United States
Zachut, M., Department of Dairy Cattle, Institute of Animal Sciences, Volcani Center, PO Box 6, Bet-Dagan, 50250, Israel
Erdman, R.A., Department of Animal and Avian Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park 20742, United States
The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the transfer efficiency of α-linolenic acid (ALA) from the abomasum into milk fat, its interaction with milk fat content and yield, and the relationship between ALA and C16:0 in milk fat. Three rumen-fistulated multiparous Holstein cows at midlactation were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. Treatments consisted of abomasal infusion of (1) 110. mL of water/d (control), (2) 110. mL of flaxseed oil/d (low flaxseed oil, LFO), and (3) 220. mL of flaxseed oil/d (high flaxseed oil, HFO). Experimental periods were continued for 2 wk and fat supplements were infused abomasally during the last 7 d of each period. Average dry matter intake and milk yield were not affected by oil infusion. Milk fat and lactose content tended to be greater with flaxseed infusion compared with the control. Plasma ALA was 2.9- and 4.0-fold greater with LFO and HFO, respectively. The apparent transfer efficiency of ALA to milk was 44.8 and 45.7% with LFO and HFO, respectively. The C16:0 content in milk fat was decreased by 3.59 and 5.25 percentage units, whereas the ALA content was increased by 1.68 and 3.09 percentage units with LFO and HFO, respectively. Similarly, C18:2n-6 was increased by 0.95 and 1.31 percentage units with LFA and HFO, respectively, without changes in other fatty acids (FA). Total polyunsaturated FA was 4.4 and 2.7% lower in the HFO and LFO, respectively, than in the control. Furthermore, C16:0 content in the milk fat was reduced to a greater extent than the increase in ALA content, as a 1.68 and 3.09 percentage unit increase occurred in ALA compared with a 3.6 and 5.25 percentage unit decrease in C16:0 for LFO and HFO, respectively, such that a negative correlation existed between ALA and C16:0 (r = -0.72). In conclusion, abomasal infusion of flaxseed oil dramatically increased the ALA content in plasma and milk fat. Because the replacement of C16:0 with ALA and C18:2n-6 occurred without changes in other FA presumed to be synthesized de novo in the mammary gland, this suggests that the preformed C16:0 was replaced, rather than being caused, by an overall suppression of de novo FA synthesis in the mammary gland. © 2012 American Dairy Science Association.
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Transfer rate of α-linolenic acid from abomasally infused flaxseed oil into milk fat and the effects on milk fatty acid composition in dairy cows
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Moallem, U., Department of Dairy Cattle, Institute of Animal Sciences, Volcani Center, PO Box 6, Bet-Dagan, 50250, Israel
Vyas, D., Department of Animal and Avian Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park 20742, United States
Teter, B.B., Department of Animal and Avian Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park 20742, United States
Delmonte, P., Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration, College Park, MD 20742, United States
Zachut, M., Department of Dairy Cattle, Institute of Animal Sciences, Volcani Center, PO Box 6, Bet-Dagan, 50250, Israel
Erdman, R.A., Department of Animal and Avian Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park 20742, United States
Transfer rate of α-linolenic acid from abomasally infused flaxseed oil into milk fat and the effects on milk fatty acid composition in dairy cows
The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the transfer efficiency of α-linolenic acid (ALA) from the abomasum into milk fat, its interaction with milk fat content and yield, and the relationship between ALA and C16:0 in milk fat. Three rumen-fistulated multiparous Holstein cows at midlactation were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. Treatments consisted of abomasal infusion of (1) 110. mL of water/d (control), (2) 110. mL of flaxseed oil/d (low flaxseed oil, LFO), and (3) 220. mL of flaxseed oil/d (high flaxseed oil, HFO). Experimental periods were continued for 2 wk and fat supplements were infused abomasally during the last 7 d of each period. Average dry matter intake and milk yield were not affected by oil infusion. Milk fat and lactose content tended to be greater with flaxseed infusion compared with the control. Plasma ALA was 2.9- and 4.0-fold greater with LFO and HFO, respectively. The apparent transfer efficiency of ALA to milk was 44.8 and 45.7% with LFO and HFO, respectively. The C16:0 content in milk fat was decreased by 3.59 and 5.25 percentage units, whereas the ALA content was increased by 1.68 and 3.09 percentage units with LFO and HFO, respectively. Similarly, C18:2n-6 was increased by 0.95 and 1.31 percentage units with LFA and HFO, respectively, without changes in other fatty acids (FA). Total polyunsaturated FA was 4.4 and 2.7% lower in the HFO and LFO, respectively, than in the control. Furthermore, C16:0 content in the milk fat was reduced to a greater extent than the increase in ALA content, as a 1.68 and 3.09 percentage unit increase occurred in ALA compared with a 3.6 and 5.25 percentage unit decrease in C16:0 for LFO and HFO, respectively, such that a negative correlation existed between ALA and C16:0 (r = -0.72). In conclusion, abomasal infusion of flaxseed oil dramatically increased the ALA content in plasma and milk fat. Because the replacement of C16:0 with ALA and C18:2n-6 occurred without changes in other FA presumed to be synthesized de novo in the mammary gland, this suggests that the preformed C16:0 was replaced, rather than being caused, by an overall suppression of de novo FA synthesis in the mammary gland. © 2012 American Dairy Science Association.
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