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Kipnis, T., Agric. Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Feigin, A., Agric. Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Vaisman, I., Agric. Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Shalhevet, J., Agric. Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
A high N input originating from intensive application of effluent water may well increase dry-matter production but it also increases the pollution hazard. Frequent application of relatively small quantities of effluent water was suggested as an efficient method of improving N uptake by Chloris gayana swards. It was expected that nitrate pollution would be reduced and N fertilizer could be saved. Irrigation according to 100% class A pan evaporation (c.1000 mm) revealed the superiority of twice-a-week application of effluents on fine soil. This schedule resulted in high yields and high N recovery as well as no response to additional N fertilization. Differences between irrigation frequencies diminished as N input increased, and effluent application was reduced to 80% of class A pan evaporation. Total N input higher than 660 and 380 kg/ha did not increase dry-matter production on fine and sand dune soils, respectively, but did increase N losses.-from Authors
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Waste-water application, dry-matter production, and nitrogen balance of rhodesgrass grown on fine-textured soil or on sand dunes ( Chloris gayana).
Kipnis, T., Agric. Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Feigin, A., Agric. Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Vaisman, I., Agric. Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Shalhevet, J., Agric. Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.
Waste-water application, dry-matter production, and nitrogen balance of rhodesgrass grown on fine-textured soil or on sand dunes ( Chloris gayana).
A high N input originating from intensive application of effluent water may well increase dry-matter production but it also increases the pollution hazard. Frequent application of relatively small quantities of effluent water was suggested as an efficient method of improving N uptake by Chloris gayana swards. It was expected that nitrate pollution would be reduced and N fertilizer could be saved. Irrigation according to 100% class A pan evaporation (c.1000 mm) revealed the superiority of twice-a-week application of effluents on fine soil. This schedule resulted in high yields and high N recovery as well as no response to additional N fertilization. Differences between irrigation frequencies diminished as N input increased, and effluent application was reduced to 80% of class A pan evaporation. Total N input higher than 660 and 380 kg/ha did not increase dry-matter production on fine and sand dune soils, respectively, but did increase N losses.-from Authors
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