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Brand, M., Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, ARO, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel, Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Messika, Y., Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, ARO, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel, Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Elad, Y., Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, ARO, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Rav David, D., Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, ARO, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Sztejnberg, A., Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
The effects of several spray and climate treatments on Leveillula taurica were tested under controlled and commercial greenhouse conditions either alone or combined with a climate treatment. Ampelomyces quisqualis AQ10 inhibited the germination of conidia on leaves, but not on glass. Trichoderma harzianum T39 inhibited germination on both surfaces. Neither the examined biological control agents (BCAs) nor the two tested mineral oils (AddQ and JMS Stylet-Oil) affected the viability of conidia. Sulphur drastically limited the germination and viability of L. taurica. In experiments at 15-25°C, AQ10 alone reduced hyphal leaf colonisation at 25°C. T. harzianum T39 significantly reduced leaf colonisation at all temperatures but significantly reduced disease only at 20-25°C. The oils significantly reduced leaf colonisation and sulphur reduced both leaf colonisation and disease at all temperatures. Results were confirmed in an experimental greenhouse. In a field experiment, azoxystrobin, polyoxin AL, neem extract, and T39 were effective; sulphur was superior to them. Under severe epidemic conditions the disease had a negative impact on yield; late fungicide treatments at spring-time were found unnecessary. Chemical sprays applied in alternation was compared with the 'friendly' spray regime (alternation of Heliosoufre, T. harzianum T39 + JMS Stylet oil, A. quisqualis AQ10+AddQ oil and Neemgard) in two climates i.e. (i.) day warm climate and (ii.) regular (cool) day climate regimes. In the warm climate, there was no significant difference in the performance of the 'friendly' spray regime and the chemical spray regime. However, in the cooler climate, the 'friendly' spray programme was not as effective as the chemical spray programme. It was concluded that a change in the greenhouse climate may affect the development of powdery mildew and, at the same time, promote the activity of BCAs and render a pathogen more vulnerable to these control agents, allowing for better disease suppression. © 2009 KNPV.
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Spray treatments combined with climate modification for the management of Leveillula taurica in sweet pepper
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Brand, M., Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, ARO, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel, Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Messika, Y., Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, ARO, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel, Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Elad, Y., Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, ARO, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Rav David, D., Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, ARO, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Sztejnberg, A., Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Spray treatments combined with climate modification for the management of Leveillula taurica in sweet pepper
The effects of several spray and climate treatments on Leveillula taurica were tested under controlled and commercial greenhouse conditions either alone or combined with a climate treatment. Ampelomyces quisqualis AQ10 inhibited the germination of conidia on leaves, but not on glass. Trichoderma harzianum T39 inhibited germination on both surfaces. Neither the examined biological control agents (BCAs) nor the two tested mineral oils (AddQ and JMS Stylet-Oil) affected the viability of conidia. Sulphur drastically limited the germination and viability of L. taurica. In experiments at 15-25°C, AQ10 alone reduced hyphal leaf colonisation at 25°C. T. harzianum T39 significantly reduced leaf colonisation at all temperatures but significantly reduced disease only at 20-25°C. The oils significantly reduced leaf colonisation and sulphur reduced both leaf colonisation and disease at all temperatures. Results were confirmed in an experimental greenhouse. In a field experiment, azoxystrobin, polyoxin AL, neem extract, and T39 were effective; sulphur was superior to them. Under severe epidemic conditions the disease had a negative impact on yield; late fungicide treatments at spring-time were found unnecessary. Chemical sprays applied in alternation was compared with the 'friendly' spray regime (alternation of Heliosoufre, T. harzianum T39 + JMS Stylet oil, A. quisqualis AQ10+AddQ oil and Neemgard) in two climates i.e. (i.) day warm climate and (ii.) regular (cool) day climate regimes. In the warm climate, there was no significant difference in the performance of the 'friendly' spray regime and the chemical spray regime. However, in the cooler climate, the 'friendly' spray programme was not as effective as the chemical spray programme. It was concluded that a change in the greenhouse climate may affect the development of powdery mildew and, at the same time, promote the activity of BCAs and render a pathogen more vulnerable to these control agents, allowing for better disease suppression. © 2009 KNPV.
Scientific Publication
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