Advanced Search
Stewart Postharvest Review
Lers, A., Department of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Department of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Burd, S., Department of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Purpose of review: Recent advances made in the study of the senescence process in plants has resulted in significant and interesting insights that have already been used to retard the process in transgenic plants by manipulating the expression of the relevant genes. This review summarises some of the studies relevant to postharvest senescence that may serve as a good base for further development of biotechnological strategies designed to control the postharvest senescence process in crop plants. Main findings: Senescence can be retarded by manipulating various genes where products function in different aspects of senescence. These include regulatory functions such as transcriptional activation, involvement in ethylene or cytokinin biosynthesis or perception, involvement in the oxidative status of cells during senescence or participation in catabolic processes associated with senescence. The identification of appropriate target genes for manipulation of senescence should be accompanied by isolation of suitable regulatory elements for their activation. Specific activation in terms of time and localisation is crucial for effective application, as was demonstrated by the use of senescence-specific promoters or promoters that are mainly active under conditions relevant for postharvest storage. Directions for future research: A large number of potential target genes for manipulation already exist and the number may increase further as a result of ongoing basic research. More emphasis should be given to applied studies aimed at examining the outcome of practical applications of biotechnological manipulation of these genes for retarding the postharvest senescence in crop plants. Commercialisation of such genetically-modified edible fresh produce seems uncertain at this point. However, it may materialise in the long term, thus time should now be utilised for developing efficient, senescence-retarding, biotechnological strategies that involve the identification of appropriate regulatory elements for specific activation of gene expression. © 2007 Stewart Postharvest Solutions (UK) Ltd.
Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
The potential to retard postharvest senescence using biotechnology
3
Lers, A., Department of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel, Department of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Burd, S., Department of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
The potential to retard postharvest senescence using biotechnology
Purpose of review: Recent advances made in the study of the senescence process in plants has resulted in significant and interesting insights that have already been used to retard the process in transgenic plants by manipulating the expression of the relevant genes. This review summarises some of the studies relevant to postharvest senescence that may serve as a good base for further development of biotechnological strategies designed to control the postharvest senescence process in crop plants. Main findings: Senescence can be retarded by manipulating various genes where products function in different aspects of senescence. These include regulatory functions such as transcriptional activation, involvement in ethylene or cytokinin biosynthesis or perception, involvement in the oxidative status of cells during senescence or participation in catabolic processes associated with senescence. The identification of appropriate target genes for manipulation of senescence should be accompanied by isolation of suitable regulatory elements for their activation. Specific activation in terms of time and localisation is crucial for effective application, as was demonstrated by the use of senescence-specific promoters or promoters that are mainly active under conditions relevant for postharvest storage. Directions for future research: A large number of potential target genes for manipulation already exist and the number may increase further as a result of ongoing basic research. More emphasis should be given to applied studies aimed at examining the outcome of practical applications of biotechnological manipulation of these genes for retarding the postharvest senescence in crop plants. Commercialisation of such genetically-modified edible fresh produce seems uncertain at this point. However, it may materialise in the long term, thus time should now be utilised for developing efficient, senescence-retarding, biotechnological strategies that involve the identification of appropriate regulatory elements for specific activation of gene expression. © 2007 Stewart Postharvest Solutions (UK) Ltd.
Scientific Publication
You may also be interested in