Advanced Search
Bulletin of Entomological Research
Johnson, A.J., USDA-ARS, Crop Production and Pest Control Unit, 170 South University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States, Purdue University, Department of Entomology, 901 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Weintraub, P.G., Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, D.N. Negev, 85280, Israel
Katoch, R., CSKHPKV, Palampur, HP, 176062, India
Schemerhorn, B.J., USDA-ARS, Crop Production and Pest Control Unit, 170 South University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States, Purdue University, Department of Entomology, 901 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Shukle, R.H., USDA-ARS, Crop Production and Pest Control Unit, 170 South University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States, Purdue University, Department of Entomology, 901 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Samples of a dipteran pest of wheat were tested to confirm identity, describe local populations and suggest the use of deploying resistance (R) genes in wheat cultivars for control of Mayetiola destructor, Hessian fly (HF). Morphological evaluation of adults and a free-choice oviposition preference test documenting that females overwhelmingly preferred to oviposit on wheat instead of barley supported they were HF. Using the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (coxI), the Barcoding Region, nine haplotypes were revealed. Two were found only in the Israeli collections and averaged 3% sequence divergence compared to the other seven haplotypes found in the United States, Israel and Syria. In evaluations of virulence, the Israeli HF in culture was virulent to 11 of the 19 (R) genes tested, and complementation analysis documented that, for four of the R genes tested, the Israeli HF shared loci for virulence with HF from the United States. Levels of HF infestation at seven Israeli fields were at least at the 5-8% level, which historically has indicated a significant yield loss. Microsatellite genotyping of the five HF collections from Israel revealed mixed populations in Israel that are distinctly separate from the single population in Syria. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.
Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Biological and molecular characterization of Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) from Israel
102
Johnson, A.J., USDA-ARS, Crop Production and Pest Control Unit, 170 South University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States, Purdue University, Department of Entomology, 901 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Weintraub, P.G., Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, D.N. Negev, 85280, Israel
Katoch, R., CSKHPKV, Palampur, HP, 176062, India
Schemerhorn, B.J., USDA-ARS, Crop Production and Pest Control Unit, 170 South University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States, Purdue University, Department of Entomology, 901 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Shukle, R.H., USDA-ARS, Crop Production and Pest Control Unit, 170 South University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States, Purdue University, Department of Entomology, 901 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States
Biological and molecular characterization of Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) from Israel
Samples of a dipteran pest of wheat were tested to confirm identity, describe local populations and suggest the use of deploying resistance (R) genes in wheat cultivars for control of Mayetiola destructor, Hessian fly (HF). Morphological evaluation of adults and a free-choice oviposition preference test documenting that females overwhelmingly preferred to oviposit on wheat instead of barley supported they were HF. Using the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (coxI), the Barcoding Region, nine haplotypes were revealed. Two were found only in the Israeli collections and averaged 3% sequence divergence compared to the other seven haplotypes found in the United States, Israel and Syria. In evaluations of virulence, the Israeli HF in culture was virulent to 11 of the 19 (R) genes tested, and complementation analysis documented that, for four of the R genes tested, the Israeli HF shared loci for virulence with HF from the United States. Levels of HF infestation at seven Israeli fields were at least at the 5-8% level, which historically has indicated a significant yield loss. Microsatellite genotyping of the five HF collections from Israel revealed mixed populations in Israel that are distinctly separate from the single population in Syria. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.
Scientific Publication
You may also be interested in