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Journal of Apicultural Research
Delaplane, K.S., Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, United States
Dag, A., Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Ministry of Agriculture, Mobile Post, Negev 85280, Israel
Danka, R.G., Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics, and Physiology Research, 1157 Ben Hur Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70820, United States
Freitas, B.M., Departamento de Zootecnia - CCA, Universidade Federal do Ceará, C.P. 12168, Fortaleza - CE, 60.021-970, Brazil
Garibaldi, L.A., Sede Andina, Universidad Nacional de Río Negro (UNRN), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mitre 630, CP 8400, San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro, Argentina
Goodwin, R.M., New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Plant and Food Research Ruakura, Private Bag 3123, Hamilton 3240, New Zealand
Hormaza, J.I., Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterranea La Mayora (IHSM La Mayora-CSIC-UMA), 29750 Algarrobo-Costa, Málaga, Spain
In this chapter we present a synthesis of recommendations for conducting field experiments with honey bees in the context of agricultural pollination. We begin with an overview of methods for determining the mating system requirements of plants and the efficacy of specific pollinators. We describe methods for evaluating the pollen-vectoring capacity of bees at the level of individuals or colonies and follow with methods for determining optimum colony field stocking densities. We include sections for determining post-harvest effects of pollination, the effects of colony management (including glasshouse enclosure) on bee pollination performance, and a brief section on considerations about pesticides and their impact on pollinator performance. A final section gives guidance on determining the economic valuation of honey bee colony inputs at the scale of the farm or region. © IBRA 2013.
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Standard methods for pollination research with Apis mellifera
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Delaplane, K.S., Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, United States
Dag, A., Gilat Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Ministry of Agriculture, Mobile Post, Negev 85280, Israel
Danka, R.G., Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics, and Physiology Research, 1157 Ben Hur Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70820, United States
Freitas, B.M., Departamento de Zootecnia - CCA, Universidade Federal do Ceará, C.P. 12168, Fortaleza - CE, 60.021-970, Brazil
Garibaldi, L.A., Sede Andina, Universidad Nacional de Río Negro (UNRN), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mitre 630, CP 8400, San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro, Argentina
Goodwin, R.M., New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Plant and Food Research Ruakura, Private Bag 3123, Hamilton 3240, New Zealand
Hormaza, J.I., Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterranea La Mayora (IHSM La Mayora-CSIC-UMA), 29750 Algarrobo-Costa, Málaga, Spain
Standard methods for pollination research with Apis mellifera
In this chapter we present a synthesis of recommendations for conducting field experiments with honey bees in the context of agricultural pollination. We begin with an overview of methods for determining the mating system requirements of plants and the efficacy of specific pollinators. We describe methods for evaluating the pollen-vectoring capacity of bees at the level of individuals or colonies and follow with methods for determining optimum colony field stocking densities. We include sections for determining post-harvest effects of pollination, the effects of colony management (including glasshouse enclosure) on bee pollination performance, and a brief section on considerations about pesticides and their impact on pollinator performance. A final section gives guidance on determining the economic valuation of honey bee colony inputs at the scale of the farm or region. © IBRA 2013.
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