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Goldwasser, Y., Department of Weed Research, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe Ya'ar Research Center, P.O. Box 1021, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Kleifeld, Y., Department of Weed Research, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe Ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Plakhine, D., Department of Weed Research, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe Ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Rubin, B., Dept. Fld. Crops, Vegetables Genet., Fac. Agric., Food Environ. Qual. S., Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Orobanche aegyptiaca is a chlorophyll-lacking holoparasite that subsists on the roots of plants, inflicting severe damage to legumes and other crops in the Mediterranean region. Common vetch and purple vetch are important legume forage crops in Israel and the Middle East. Experiments in pots containing soil inoculated with O. aegyptiaca seeds have shown that common vetch genotypes 'Yovel' and '473-A' are susceptible to the parasite, whereas purple vetch genotypes 'Popany' and 'Sadot' are resistant. When grown in association with O. aegyptiaca in polyethene bags, purple vetch genotypes stimulated a significantly higher rate of parasite seed germination than that stimulated by common vetch genotypes. However, the number of successful Orobanche attachments developed on the host root was lower on resistant genotypes compared to susceptible ones. This differential response between purple and common Vetch genotypes was evident at diverse temperature regimes (17/12, 22/17, and 27/22 C day/night). Microscopic observations revealed that resistant genotypes rapidly developed necrotic lesions surrounding the contact point of the parasite radicle (germ tube) with the host root, hence preventing further development of the parasite. In the sensitive genotypes, attachments developed without necrotic lesions. These data may indicate involvement of host defense mechanisms induced by the parasite attachment.
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Variation in vetch (vicia spp.) response to Orobanche aegyptiaca
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Goldwasser, Y., Department of Weed Research, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe Ya'ar Research Center, P.O. Box 1021, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Kleifeld, Y., Department of Weed Research, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe Ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Plakhine, D., Department of Weed Research, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe Ya'ar Research Center, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel
Rubin, B., Dept. Fld. Crops, Vegetables Genet., Fac. Agric., Food Environ. Qual. S., Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Variation in vetch (vicia spp.) response to Orobanche aegyptiaca
Orobanche aegyptiaca is a chlorophyll-lacking holoparasite that subsists on the roots of plants, inflicting severe damage to legumes and other crops in the Mediterranean region. Common vetch and purple vetch are important legume forage crops in Israel and the Middle East. Experiments in pots containing soil inoculated with O. aegyptiaca seeds have shown that common vetch genotypes 'Yovel' and '473-A' are susceptible to the parasite, whereas purple vetch genotypes 'Popany' and 'Sadot' are resistant. When grown in association with O. aegyptiaca in polyethene bags, purple vetch genotypes stimulated a significantly higher rate of parasite seed germination than that stimulated by common vetch genotypes. However, the number of successful Orobanche attachments developed on the host root was lower on resistant genotypes compared to susceptible ones. This differential response between purple and common Vetch genotypes was evident at diverse temperature regimes (17/12, 22/17, and 27/22 C day/night). Microscopic observations revealed that resistant genotypes rapidly developed necrotic lesions surrounding the contact point of the parasite radicle (germ tube) with the host root, hence preventing further development of the parasite. In the sensitive genotypes, attachments developed without necrotic lesions. These data may indicate involvement of host defense mechanisms induced by the parasite attachment.
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