Advanced Search
Nature Biotechnology
Schauer, N., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Semel, Y., Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Roessner, U., Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics, School of Botany, University of Melbourne, Vic. 3010, Australia
Gur, A., Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Balbo, I., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Carrari, F., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Pleban, T., Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Perez-Melis, A., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Bruedigam, C., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Kopka, J., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Willmitzer, L., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Zamir, D., Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Fernie, A.R., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Tomato represents an important source of fiber and nutrients in the human diet and is a central model for the study of fruit biology. To identify components of fruit metabolic composition, here we have phenotyped tomato introgression lines (ILs) containing chromosome segments of a wild species in the genetic background of a cultivated variety. Using this high-diversity population, we identify 889 quantitative fruit metabolic loci and 326 loci that modify yield-associated traits. The mapping analysis indicates that at least 50% of the metabolic loci are associated with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that modify whole-plant yield-associated traits. We generate a cartographic network based on correlation analysis that reveals whole-plant phenotype associated and independent metabolic associations, including links with metabolites of nutritional and organoleptic importance. The results of our genomic survey illustrate the power of genome-wide metabolic profiling and detailed morphological analysis for uncovering traits with potential for crop breeding. © 2006 Nature Publishing Group.
Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Comprehensive metabolic profiling and phenotyping of interspecific introgression lines for tomato improvement
24
Schauer, N., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Semel, Y., Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Roessner, U., Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics, School of Botany, University of Melbourne, Vic. 3010, Australia
Gur, A., Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Balbo, I., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Carrari, F., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Pleban, T., Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Perez-Melis, A., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Bruedigam, C., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Kopka, J., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Willmitzer, L., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Zamir, D., Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Fernie, A.R., Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Am Mühlenberg 1, 14476 Golm, Germany
Comprehensive metabolic profiling and phenotyping of interspecific introgression lines for tomato improvement
Tomato represents an important source of fiber and nutrients in the human diet and is a central model for the study of fruit biology. To identify components of fruit metabolic composition, here we have phenotyped tomato introgression lines (ILs) containing chromosome segments of a wild species in the genetic background of a cultivated variety. Using this high-diversity population, we identify 889 quantitative fruit metabolic loci and 326 loci that modify yield-associated traits. The mapping analysis indicates that at least 50% of the metabolic loci are associated with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that modify whole-plant yield-associated traits. We generate a cartographic network based on correlation analysis that reveals whole-plant phenotype associated and independent metabolic associations, including links with metabolites of nutritional and organoleptic importance. The results of our genomic survey illustrate the power of genome-wide metabolic profiling and detailed morphological analysis for uncovering traits with potential for crop breeding. © 2006 Nature Publishing Group.
Scientific Publication
You may also be interested in