Poultry Science
Bartov, I.
Paster, N.
Lisker, N.
The effect was determined of mold development in corn and sorghum grains on their lipid content and nutritional value for broiler chicks. The grains, whole or ground, with their original moisture content (12.1 to 13.0%) or increased moisture content (15.0% moisture), were stored for 63 to 96 days prior to their incorporation into the diets fed to the chicks. Increasing the moisture content caused the development of the naturally occurring fungi (mainly Penicillium and Aspergillus spp.). The moldy grains did not contain aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin A, patulin, sterigmatocystin or zearalenone. Storage of whole or ground grains or of moistened whole corn did not result in differences in their fat content, in the metabolizable energy (ME) of the diets containing these grains, or in the performance of chicks fed these diets, but moistened whole sorghum affected performance adversely. Fat content in moistened ground grains decreased markedly during storage, but fatty acid ratios, vitamin E, carotene, xanthophyll, and protein levels were not markedly affected. These ground moldy grains reduced the dietary fat level during the 3 weeks of the feeding period in two out of three experiments and significantly (P less than .05) lowered ME values and depressed performance. Soybean oil supplementations to diets containing these grains increased dietary ME values and partially or completely restored performance. It is concluded, therefore, that the decreased energy level in diets containing ground moldy grains (not containing mycotoxins) is an important factor for their reduced nutritional value.
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The nutritional value of moldy grains for broiler chicks.
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Bartov, I.
Paster, N.
Lisker, N.
The nutritional value of moldy grains for broiler chicks.
The effect was determined of mold development in corn and sorghum grains on their lipid content and nutritional value for broiler chicks. The grains, whole or ground, with their original moisture content (12.1 to 13.0%) or increased moisture content (15.0% moisture), were stored for 63 to 96 days prior to their incorporation into the diets fed to the chicks. Increasing the moisture content caused the development of the naturally occurring fungi (mainly Penicillium and Aspergillus spp.). The moldy grains did not contain aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin A, patulin, sterigmatocystin or zearalenone. Storage of whole or ground grains or of moistened whole corn did not result in differences in their fat content, in the metabolizable energy (ME) of the diets containing these grains, or in the performance of chicks fed these diets, but moistened whole sorghum affected performance adversely. Fat content in moistened ground grains decreased markedly during storage, but fatty acid ratios, vitamin E, carotene, xanthophyll, and protein levels were not markedly affected. These ground moldy grains reduced the dietary fat level during the 3 weeks of the feeding period in two out of three experiments and significantly (P less than .05) lowered ME values and depressed performance. Soybean oil supplementations to diets containing these grains increased dietary ME values and partially or completely restored performance. It is concluded, therefore, that the decreased energy level in diets containing ground moldy grains (not containing mycotoxins) is an important factor for their reduced nutritional value.
Scientific Publication