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Journal of Phytopathology
Tsror, L., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Experiment Station, MP Negev 85280, Israel
Hazanovski, M., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Experiment Station, MP Negev 85280, Israel
Erlich, O., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Experiment Station, MP Negev 85280, Israel
Jojoba [Simmondsia chinensis (Link) Schneider] plantations in Israel originated from vegetative propagation, planted during 1991-92, have shown symptoms of wilting and subsequent death. Verticillium dahliae was only rarely isolated from these plants and artificial inoculation showed only mild disease symptoms. Fusarium oxysporum caused severe chlorosis, desiccation, defoliation and wilt in leaves of jojoba plants, resulting in plant death. Recovery of the fungus from artificially inoculated stem cuttings and seedlings showed for the first time that F. oxysporum was the primary pathogen. Inoculated cuttings exhibited wilt within 3 weeks, while in seedlings wilt occurred 10-24 weeks after inoculation. Seedlings and cuttings of jojoba which were inoculated with other Fusarium isolates originating from different crops (F. oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum from cotton, F. oxysporum f. sp. dianthi from carnation, F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici from tomato and F. oxysporum f. sp. basilicum from basil) did not develop symptoms. Moreover, cotton, tomato, melon and cucumber seedlings inoculated with several virulent F. oxysporum isolates from jojoba did not show any symptoms of wilt or defoliation. These results indicate a high degree of specificity of the Fusarium isolates from jojoba; therefore, it is suggested that this isolate be defined as F. oxysporum f. sp. simmondsia. © 2007 The Authors Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Verlag.
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Host-specific Fusarium oxysporum causes wilt of Jojoba
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Tsror, L., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Experiment Station, MP Negev 85280, Israel
Hazanovski, M., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Experiment Station, MP Negev 85280, Israel
Erlich, O., Department of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Experiment Station, MP Negev 85280, Israel
Host-specific Fusarium oxysporum causes wilt of Jojoba
Jojoba [Simmondsia chinensis (Link) Schneider] plantations in Israel originated from vegetative propagation, planted during 1991-92, have shown symptoms of wilting and subsequent death. Verticillium dahliae was only rarely isolated from these plants and artificial inoculation showed only mild disease symptoms. Fusarium oxysporum caused severe chlorosis, desiccation, defoliation and wilt in leaves of jojoba plants, resulting in plant death. Recovery of the fungus from artificially inoculated stem cuttings and seedlings showed for the first time that F. oxysporum was the primary pathogen. Inoculated cuttings exhibited wilt within 3 weeks, while in seedlings wilt occurred 10-24 weeks after inoculation. Seedlings and cuttings of jojoba which were inoculated with other Fusarium isolates originating from different crops (F. oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum from cotton, F. oxysporum f. sp. dianthi from carnation, F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici from tomato and F. oxysporum f. sp. basilicum from basil) did not develop symptoms. Moreover, cotton, tomato, melon and cucumber seedlings inoculated with several virulent F. oxysporum isolates from jojoba did not show any symptoms of wilt or defoliation. These results indicate a high degree of specificity of the Fusarium isolates from jojoba; therefore, it is suggested that this isolate be defined as F. oxysporum f. sp. simmondsia. © 2007 The Authors Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Verlag.
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