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Villordon, A.Q., Louisiana State University Agricultural Center Sweet Potato Research Station, Chase, LA 71324, United States
Ginzberg, I., Institute of Plant Sciences, The Volcani Center, Agricultural Research Organization, PO Box 6, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Firon, N., Institute of Plant Sciences, The Volcani Center, Agricultural Research Organization, PO Box 6, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
It is becoming increasingly evident that optimization of root architecture for resource capture is vital for enabling the next green revolution. Although cereals provide half of the calories consumed by humans, root and tuber crops are the second major source of carbohydrates globally. Yet, knowledge of root architecture in root and tuber species is limited. In this opinion article, we highlight what is known about the root system in root and tuber crops, and mark new research directions towards a better understanding of the relation between root architecture and yield. We believe that unraveling the role of root architecture in root and tuber crop productivity will improve global food security, especially in regions with marginal soil fertility and low-input agricultural systems. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.
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Root architecture and root and tuber crop productivity
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Villordon, A.Q., Louisiana State University Agricultural Center Sweet Potato Research Station, Chase, LA 71324, United States
Ginzberg, I., Institute of Plant Sciences, The Volcani Center, Agricultural Research Organization, PO Box 6, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Firon, N., Institute of Plant Sciences, The Volcani Center, Agricultural Research Organization, PO Box 6, Bet Dagan, 50250, Israel
Root architecture and root and tuber crop productivity
It is becoming increasingly evident that optimization of root architecture for resource capture is vital for enabling the next green revolution. Although cereals provide half of the calories consumed by humans, root and tuber crops are the second major source of carbohydrates globally. Yet, knowledge of root architecture in root and tuber species is limited. In this opinion article, we highlight what is known about the root system in root and tuber crops, and mark new research directions towards a better understanding of the relation between root architecture and yield. We believe that unraveling the role of root architecture in root and tuber crop productivity will improve global food security, especially in regions with marginal soil fertility and low-input agricultural systems. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.
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