Journal of Food Quality
ANGEL, S., Department of Food Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
WEINBERG, Z.G., Department of Food Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
JAFFE, R., Department of Food Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
Salt content in the breast, thigh and skin was determined in chickens which had been kosher‐processed with different salting times, quantities and different numbers of rinses and after cooking. Significant differences in the salt content were obtained after 1.5 h of salting. Salt quantity significantly affected only the thigh and skin. Rinsings had no effect in reducing salt content in the breast and thigh. Cooking did not reduce the salt content of the chicken except in the skin. The salt treatments used in this study, which were similar to those used in commercial kosher dressing plants, did not increase uptake of water. Copyright © 1989, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved
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SALT CONTENT OF KOSHER CHICKEN PARTS STUDIED UNDER CONTROLLED CONDITIONS
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ANGEL, S., Department of Food Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
WEINBERG, Z.G., Department of Food Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
JAFFE, R., Department of Food Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan, 50-250, Israel
SALT CONTENT OF KOSHER CHICKEN PARTS STUDIED UNDER CONTROLLED CONDITIONS
Salt content in the breast, thigh and skin was determined in chickens which had been kosher‐processed with different salting times, quantities and different numbers of rinses and after cooking. Significant differences in the salt content were obtained after 1.5 h of salting. Salt quantity significantly affected only the thigh and skin. Rinsings had no effect in reducing salt content in the breast and thigh. Cooking did not reduce the salt content of the chicken except in the skin. The salt treatments used in this study, which were similar to those used in commercial kosher dressing plants, did not increase uptake of water. Copyright © 1989, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved
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