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Wilson, C.L., USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, 45 Wiltshire Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430, United States
Wisniewski, M.E., USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, 45 Wiltshire Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430, United States
Biles, C.L., USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, 45 Wiltshire Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430, United States
McLaughlin, R., USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, 45 Wiltshire Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430, United States
Chalutz, E., Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Droby, S., Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Spoilage of fruits and vegetables after harvest often causes losses as great as 25-50% of the harvested crop. Much of this is due to rot micro-organisms which are currently controlled by refrigeration and fungicides. A number of bacterial and fungal antagonists have been found that can effectively control post-harvest rots of peaches, citrus, apples, grapes and tomatoes. These antagonists have various modes of action that include antibiosis and/or competition for nutrients and space. The commercialization of some of these antagonists to control post-harvest decay of fruits and vegetables appears to be feasible and may present an alternative to synthetic pesticides. © 1991.
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Biological control of post-harvest diseases of fruits and vegetables: alternatives to synthetic fungicides
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Wilson, C.L., USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, 45 Wiltshire Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430, United States
Wisniewski, M.E., USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, 45 Wiltshire Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430, United States
Biles, C.L., USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, 45 Wiltshire Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430, United States
McLaughlin, R., USDA-ARS, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, 45 Wiltshire Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430, United States
Chalutz, E., Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Droby, S., Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Biological control of post-harvest diseases of fruits and vegetables: alternatives to synthetic fungicides
Spoilage of fruits and vegetables after harvest often causes losses as great as 25-50% of the harvested crop. Much of this is due to rot micro-organisms which are currently controlled by refrigeration and fungicides. A number of bacterial and fungal antagonists have been found that can effectively control post-harvest rots of peaches, citrus, apples, grapes and tomatoes. These antagonists have various modes of action that include antibiosis and/or competition for nutrients and space. The commercialization of some of these antagonists to control post-harvest decay of fruits and vegetables appears to be feasible and may present an alternative to synthetic pesticides. © 1991.
Scientific Publication
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