Acta Horticulturae
Shi, J.X., Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel, Institute of Farm Product Storage, Shanxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Taiyuan 030031, China
Aharon, Z., Dept. of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Goren, R., Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Goldschmidt, E.E., Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Porat, R., Dept. of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Respiratory responses of citrus fruit to controlled atmospheres (CA) are of great importance, since CA treatments can be used in postharvest handling only as long as they do not cause any detrimental effects on fruit quality. In this study, we evaluated the physiological responses of 'Star Ruby' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf., 'Star Ruby') and 'Murcott' mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco, 'Murcott') to different concentrations of O2 (5, 10, 15, and 21%) or CO2 (0, 5, 10, and 20%) at 20°C for a short-term period (1 week). Exposure to reduced O2 atmospheres greatly reduced respiration rates and internal CO2 levels, but 5% O2 dramatically increased juice ethanol, and to a lesser extent, acetaldehyde (AA) levels. Exposure to 5% and 10% O2 reduced ethylene evolution rates in grapefruit but increased their levels in mandarin. Exposure to 10% and 20% CO2 markedly increased respiration rates and internal CO2 levels, but reduced ethylene production. Exposure to 20% CO2 substantially increased juice ethanol and AA levels as compared with air controls, but to a less extent as compared with exposure to 5% O2 atmosphere. Mandarin exhibited stronger and more rapid responses to reduced O2 than grapefruit, as revealed by the accumulation of juice ethanol and AA, two important indicators of anaerobic respiration. Mandarin also showed earlier and higher increases in respiration rates and internal CO2 levels than grapefruit following exposure to elevated CO2. Results indicate that reduced O2 and elevated CO2 atmospheres affect citrus fruit' respiratory characteristics differently. The possible mechanisms involved are briefly discussed.
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Short-term exposures to reduced O2 and elevated CO2 atmospheres differently affect the respiratory characteristics of grapefruit and mandarin
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Shi, J.X., Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel, Institute of Farm Product Storage, Shanxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Taiyuan 030031, China
Aharon, Z., Dept. of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Goren, R., Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Goldschmidt, E.E., Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Porat, R., Dept. of Postharvest Science of Fresh Produce, ARO, Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Short-term exposures to reduced O2 and elevated CO2 atmospheres differently affect the respiratory characteristics of grapefruit and mandarin
Respiratory responses of citrus fruit to controlled atmospheres (CA) are of great importance, since CA treatments can be used in postharvest handling only as long as they do not cause any detrimental effects on fruit quality. In this study, we evaluated the physiological responses of 'Star Ruby' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf., 'Star Ruby') and 'Murcott' mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco, 'Murcott') to different concentrations of O2 (5, 10, 15, and 21%) or CO2 (0, 5, 10, and 20%) at 20°C for a short-term period (1 week). Exposure to reduced O2 atmospheres greatly reduced respiration rates and internal CO2 levels, but 5% O2 dramatically increased juice ethanol, and to a lesser extent, acetaldehyde (AA) levels. Exposure to 5% and 10% O2 reduced ethylene evolution rates in grapefruit but increased their levels in mandarin. Exposure to 10% and 20% CO2 markedly increased respiration rates and internal CO2 levels, but reduced ethylene production. Exposure to 20% CO2 substantially increased juice ethanol and AA levels as compared with air controls, but to a less extent as compared with exposure to 5% O2 atmosphere. Mandarin exhibited stronger and more rapid responses to reduced O2 than grapefruit, as revealed by the accumulation of juice ethanol and AA, two important indicators of anaerobic respiration. Mandarin also showed earlier and higher increases in respiration rates and internal CO2 levels than grapefruit following exposure to elevated CO2. Results indicate that reduced O2 and elevated CO2 atmospheres affect citrus fruit' respiratory characteristics differently. The possible mechanisms involved are briefly discussed.
Scientific Publication