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Plant physiology (source)
Enoch, H.Z., Department of Agricultural Meteorology, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Carmi, I., Isotope Department, Weizmann Institute Of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Rounick, J.S., Isotope Department, Weizmann Institute Of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Magaritz, M., Isotope Department, Weizmann Institute Of Science, Rehovot, Israel
A method is presented which uses the13C and14C isotope abundance in CO2-enriched greenhouse crops to determine the percentage of plant organic carbon derived from artificially added CO2. In a greenhouse experiment with CO2 concentrations elevated to 1100 ± 100 microliters per liter during part of the daylight hours and maintained at normal atmospheric concentrations (340 microliters per liter) during the rest of the time, it was shown by14C analysis that between 41% and 42% of the carbon in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum var 4884) came from the artificially added CO2. Similar results were obtained from13C analyses when the CO2 pressure-dependent isotope separation was taken into account. © 1984 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
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Use of carbon isotopes to estimate incorporation of added CO2 by greenhouse-grown tomato plants
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Enoch, H.Z., Department of Agricultural Meteorology, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Carmi, I., Isotope Department, Weizmann Institute Of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Rounick, J.S., Isotope Department, Weizmann Institute Of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Magaritz, M., Isotope Department, Weizmann Institute Of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Use of carbon isotopes to estimate incorporation of added CO2 by greenhouse-grown tomato plants
A method is presented which uses the13C and14C isotope abundance in CO2-enriched greenhouse crops to determine the percentage of plant organic carbon derived from artificially added CO2. In a greenhouse experiment with CO2 concentrations elevated to 1100 ± 100 microliters per liter during part of the daylight hours and maintained at normal atmospheric concentrations (340 microliters per liter) during the rest of the time, it was shown by14C analysis that between 41% and 42% of the carbon in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum var 4884) came from the artificially added CO2. Similar results were obtained from13C analyses when the CO2 pressure-dependent isotope separation was taken into account. © 1984 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
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