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Plant physiology (source)
Redman, R.S., Western Fisheries Research Center, Biological Resources Division, United States Geological Survey, 6505 N.E. 65th Street, Seattle, WA 98115, United States, Department of Botany, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-5325, United States
Freeman, S., Department of Plant Pathology, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Clifton, D.R., Western Fisheries Research Center, Biological Resources Division, United States Geological Survey, 6505 N.E. 65th Street, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
Morrel, J., Western Fisheries Research Center, Biological Resources Division, United States Geological Survey, 6505 N.E. 65th Street, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
Brown, G., Western Fisheries Research Center, Biological Resources Division, United States Geological Survey, 6505 N.E. 65th Street, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
Rodriguez, R.J., Western Fisheries Research Center, Biological Resources Division, United States Geological Survey, 6505 N.E. 65th Street, Seattle, WA 98115, United States, Department of Botany, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-5325, United States
A nonpathogenic mutant of Colletotrichum magna (path-1) was previously shown to protect watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings from anthracnose disease elicited by wild-type C. magna. Disease protection was observed in stems of path-1-colonized cucurbits but not in cotyledons, indicating that path-1 conferred tissue-specific and/or localized protection. Plant biochemical indicators of a localized and systemic (peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, lignin, and salicylic acid) 'plant-defense' response were investigated in anthracnose-resistant and -susceptible cultivars of cucurbit seedlings exposed to four treatments: (1) water (control), (2) path-1 conidia, (3) wild-type conidia, and (4) challenge conditions (inoculation into path-1 conidia for 48 h and then exposure to wild-type conidia). Collectively, these analyses indicated that disease protection in path-1 colonized plants was correlated with the ability of these plants to mount a defense response more rapidly and to equal or greater levels than plants exposed to wild-type C. magna alone. Watermelon plants colonized with path-1 were also protected against disease caused by Colletotrichum orbiculare and Fusarium oxysporum. A model based on the kinetics of plant-defense activation is presented to explain the mechanism of path-1-conferred disease protection.
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Biochemical analysis of plant protection afforded by a nonpathogenic endophytic mutant of Colletotrichum magna
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Redman, R.S., Western Fisheries Research Center, Biological Resources Division, United States Geological Survey, 6505 N.E. 65th Street, Seattle, WA 98115, United States, Department of Botany, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-5325, United States
Freeman, S., Department of Plant Pathology, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel
Clifton, D.R., Western Fisheries Research Center, Biological Resources Division, United States Geological Survey, 6505 N.E. 65th Street, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
Morrel, J., Western Fisheries Research Center, Biological Resources Division, United States Geological Survey, 6505 N.E. 65th Street, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
Brown, G., Western Fisheries Research Center, Biological Resources Division, United States Geological Survey, 6505 N.E. 65th Street, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
Rodriguez, R.J., Western Fisheries Research Center, Biological Resources Division, United States Geological Survey, 6505 N.E. 65th Street, Seattle, WA 98115, United States, Department of Botany, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-5325, United States
Biochemical analysis of plant protection afforded by a nonpathogenic endophytic mutant of Colletotrichum magna
A nonpathogenic mutant of Colletotrichum magna (path-1) was previously shown to protect watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings from anthracnose disease elicited by wild-type C. magna. Disease protection was observed in stems of path-1-colonized cucurbits but not in cotyledons, indicating that path-1 conferred tissue-specific and/or localized protection. Plant biochemical indicators of a localized and systemic (peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, lignin, and salicylic acid) 'plant-defense' response were investigated in anthracnose-resistant and -susceptible cultivars of cucurbit seedlings exposed to four treatments: (1) water (control), (2) path-1 conidia, (3) wild-type conidia, and (4) challenge conditions (inoculation into path-1 conidia for 48 h and then exposure to wild-type conidia). Collectively, these analyses indicated that disease protection in path-1 colonized plants was correlated with the ability of these plants to mount a defense response more rapidly and to equal or greater levels than plants exposed to wild-type C. magna alone. Watermelon plants colonized with path-1 were also protected against disease caused by Colletotrichum orbiculare and Fusarium oxysporum. A model based on the kinetics of plant-defense activation is presented to explain the mechanism of path-1-conferred disease protection.
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