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Gootwine, E., Department of Hormone Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Webb, C.G., Department of Hormone Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Sachs, L., Department of Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
It is of interest to determine to what extent malignant cells are still subject to control mechanisms that govern the growth and differentiation of their normal counterparts1-4. One approach has been the introduction of malignant cells into a normal embryo. Such studies have shown that mouse teratocarcinoma cells injected into blastocysts can participate in normal development to produce adult chimaeric animals with markers derived from teratocarcinoma cells1-3,5-7. Other types of malignant cells may also be able to participate in normal morphogenesis, provided that they have the ability to differentiate and are introduced into the embryo at an appropriate stage of development. Here we have examined myeloid leukaemic cells and our results indicate that injection of these cells into embryos in utero at 10 days of gestation can produce apparently healthy adult mice whose granulocytes contain a marker derived from the leukaemic cells. © 1982 Nature Publishing Group.
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Participation of myeloid leukaemic cells injected into embryos in haematopoietic differentiation in adult mice
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Gootwine, E., Department of Hormone Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Webb, C.G., Department of Hormone Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Sachs, L., Department of Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Participation of myeloid leukaemic cells injected into embryos in haematopoietic differentiation in adult mice
It is of interest to determine to what extent malignant cells are still subject to control mechanisms that govern the growth and differentiation of their normal counterparts1-4. One approach has been the introduction of malignant cells into a normal embryo. Such studies have shown that mouse teratocarcinoma cells injected into blastocysts can participate in normal development to produce adult chimaeric animals with markers derived from teratocarcinoma cells1-3,5-7. Other types of malignant cells may also be able to participate in normal morphogenesis, provided that they have the ability to differentiate and are introduced into the embryo at an appropriate stage of development. Here we have examined myeloid leukaemic cells and our results indicate that injection of these cells into embryos in utero at 10 days of gestation can produce apparently healthy adult mice whose granulocytes contain a marker derived from the leukaemic cells. © 1982 Nature Publishing Group.
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