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Pest Management Science
Muszkat, L., Department of Chemistry-Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Volcani Center, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Feigelson, L., Department of Chemistry-Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Volcani Center, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Bir, L., Department of Chemistry-Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Volcani Center, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Muszkat, K.A., Department of Structural Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Two approaches are suggested for the acceleration of the photocatalytic oxidation of organic contaminants of water: acceleration by oxidants and photo-enhancement by dyes. These processes were examined with several substances: two widely applied herbicides, bromacil (a uracil) and metribuzin (a triazine), and three proteins, studied as models of biocontaminated waters. The effects of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide indicated two different reaction patterns of photo-oxidation of the herbicides. With metribuzin, oxygen had a pronounced effect on the rate of photo-oxidation, while the influence of hydrogen peroxide was quite moderate; with bromacil, oxygen had a limited effect on the rate of photo-oxidation, which however was considerably enhanced by hydrogen peroxide. Acceleration of the photo-catalytic oxidation of colourless refractory contaminants by photo-excited dye was observed. Both UV and visible light were required for the enhanced decomposition. The mechanism of the reaction seems to involve a combination of oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, via the hole-electron semiconductor route, with subsequent oxidation of photo-intermediates by singlet oxygen formed by dye sensitization. The TiO2-photocatalyzed oxidation of proteins (albumin, ovalbumin and gammaglobulin) showed the susceptibility of proteins to photocleavage and of the amino acids to photocatalytic degradation. Tyrosine was the most sensitive, while the degradation of the aliphatic amino acids Gly and Asp was slow. © 2002 Society of Chemical Industry.
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Photocatalytic degradation of pesticides and bio-molecules in water
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Muszkat, L., Department of Chemistry-Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Volcani Center, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Feigelson, L., Department of Chemistry-Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Volcani Center, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Bir, L., Department of Chemistry-Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Volcani Center, Bet-Dagan 50250, Israel
Muszkat, K.A., Department of Structural Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Photocatalytic degradation of pesticides and bio-molecules in water
Two approaches are suggested for the acceleration of the photocatalytic oxidation of organic contaminants of water: acceleration by oxidants and photo-enhancement by dyes. These processes were examined with several substances: two widely applied herbicides, bromacil (a uracil) and metribuzin (a triazine), and three proteins, studied as models of biocontaminated waters. The effects of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide indicated two different reaction patterns of photo-oxidation of the herbicides. With metribuzin, oxygen had a pronounced effect on the rate of photo-oxidation, while the influence of hydrogen peroxide was quite moderate; with bromacil, oxygen had a limited effect on the rate of photo-oxidation, which however was considerably enhanced by hydrogen peroxide. Acceleration of the photo-catalytic oxidation of colourless refractory contaminants by photo-excited dye was observed. Both UV and visible light were required for the enhanced decomposition. The mechanism of the reaction seems to involve a combination of oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, via the hole-electron semiconductor route, with subsequent oxidation of photo-intermediates by singlet oxygen formed by dye sensitization. The TiO2-photocatalyzed oxidation of proteins (albumin, ovalbumin and gammaglobulin) showed the susceptibility of proteins to photocleavage and of the amino acids to photocatalytic degradation. Tyrosine was the most sensitive, while the degradation of the aliphatic amino acids Gly and Asp was slow. © 2002 Society of Chemical Industry.
Scientific Publication