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Journal of Chemical Ecology
Cork, A., Natural Resources Institute, Central Avenue, Chatham Maritime Chatham, ME4 4TB, Kent, United Kingdom
Boo, K.S., Department of Agricultural Biology College of Agriculture, Seoul National University, Suwon, 441-744, South Korea
Dunkelblum, E., Institute of Plant Protection, ARO The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50 250, Israel
Hall, D.R., Natural Resources Institute, Central Avenue, Chatham Maritime Chatham, ME4 4TB, Kent, United Kingdom
Jee-Rajunga, K., Division of Entomology and Zoology Department of Agriculture, Bangkhen, Bangkok, 10900, Thailand
Kehat, M., Institute of Plant Protection, ARO The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50 250, Israel
Kong JIE, E., Institute of Zoology, Academia Sinica, Beijing, China
Park, K.C., Department of Agricultural Biology College of Agriculture, Seoul National University, Suwon, 441-744, South Korea
Tepgidagarn, P., Division of Entomology and Zoology Department of Agriculture, Bangkhen, Bangkok, 10900, Thailand
Xun, L., Institute of Zoology, Academia Sinica, Beijing, China
Analysis of ovipositor washings from virgin female Helicoverpa assulta (Guenée) (Lepidoptere: Noctuidae) from Korea by gas chromatography (GC) linked to electroantennography and GC linked to mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of nine compounds, hexadecanal, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, (Z)-11-hexadecenal, hexadecyl acetate, (Z)-9-hexadecenyl acetate, (Z)-11-hexadecenyl acetate, hexadecan-l-ol, (Z)-9-hexadecen-l-ol, and (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol. However, ovipositor washings from females from Thailand contained mainly the 16-carbon aldehydes with very small amounts of (Z)-9-hexadecenyl acetate. Field tests conducted in Korea, China, and Thailand indicated that a binary blend of (Z)-9-hexadecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal was sufficient for attraction, although the most attractive ratio of compounds varied with location. In Korea a 20:1 blend of compounds was the most attractive, while in Thailand a 7.5:1 blend was most attractive. In China both blends of hexadecenal isomers were equally attractive. Addition of the hexadecenyl acetates to the 20:1 blend of hexadecenals in the ratio of 1:3.3 increased the trap catch of male H. assulta compared to lures containing the aldehydes alone in Korea but reduced trap catch in China. Addition of the hexadecenyl acetates to the 7.5:1 blend of hexadecenals had no significant effect on trap catch in Thailand or China compared to the aldehydes alone. The addition of the 16-carbon alcohols to the aldehydes had a significantly inhibitory effect in all three countries, suggesting they are not pheromone components. Taken together these results indicate that H. assulta is polymorphic with at least two populations responding to different sex pheromones. © 1992 Plenum Publishing Corporation.
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Female sex pheromone of oriental tobacco budworm, Helicoverpa assulta (Guenee) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): Identification and field testing
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Cork, A., Natural Resources Institute, Central Avenue, Chatham Maritime Chatham, ME4 4TB, Kent, United Kingdom
Boo, K.S., Department of Agricultural Biology College of Agriculture, Seoul National University, Suwon, 441-744, South Korea
Dunkelblum, E., Institute of Plant Protection, ARO The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50 250, Israel
Hall, D.R., Natural Resources Institute, Central Avenue, Chatham Maritime Chatham, ME4 4TB, Kent, United Kingdom
Jee-Rajunga, K., Division of Entomology and Zoology Department of Agriculture, Bangkhen, Bangkok, 10900, Thailand
Kehat, M., Institute of Plant Protection, ARO The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, 50 250, Israel
Kong JIE, E., Institute of Zoology, Academia Sinica, Beijing, China
Park, K.C., Department of Agricultural Biology College of Agriculture, Seoul National University, Suwon, 441-744, South Korea
Tepgidagarn, P., Division of Entomology and Zoology Department of Agriculture, Bangkhen, Bangkok, 10900, Thailand
Xun, L., Institute of Zoology, Academia Sinica, Beijing, China
Female sex pheromone of oriental tobacco budworm, Helicoverpa assulta (Guenee) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): Identification and field testing
Analysis of ovipositor washings from virgin female Helicoverpa assulta (Guenée) (Lepidoptere: Noctuidae) from Korea by gas chromatography (GC) linked to electroantennography and GC linked to mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of nine compounds, hexadecanal, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, (Z)-11-hexadecenal, hexadecyl acetate, (Z)-9-hexadecenyl acetate, (Z)-11-hexadecenyl acetate, hexadecan-l-ol, (Z)-9-hexadecen-l-ol, and (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol. However, ovipositor washings from females from Thailand contained mainly the 16-carbon aldehydes with very small amounts of (Z)-9-hexadecenyl acetate. Field tests conducted in Korea, China, and Thailand indicated that a binary blend of (Z)-9-hexadecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal was sufficient for attraction, although the most attractive ratio of compounds varied with location. In Korea a 20:1 blend of compounds was the most attractive, while in Thailand a 7.5:1 blend was most attractive. In China both blends of hexadecenal isomers were equally attractive. Addition of the hexadecenyl acetates to the 20:1 blend of hexadecenals in the ratio of 1:3.3 increased the trap catch of male H. assulta compared to lures containing the aldehydes alone in Korea but reduced trap catch in China. Addition of the hexadecenyl acetates to the 7.5:1 blend of hexadecenals had no significant effect on trap catch in Thailand or China compared to the aldehydes alone. The addition of the 16-carbon alcohols to the aldehydes had a significantly inhibitory effect in all three countries, suggesting they are not pheromone components. Taken together these results indicate that H. assulta is polymorphic with at least two populations responding to different sex pheromones. © 1992 Plenum Publishing Corporation.
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