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Clinical Biochemistry

Griffiths, W.C., Department of Pathology, The Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, United States
Lipsky, M., Department of Pathology, The Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, United States
Martin, H.F., Department of Pathology, The Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, United States

1.A protocol is presented by which inhaled volatile substances may be identified from breath samples. Further, the use of clinical laboratory data to assess the damage done by the inhaled substance is illustrated.2.Experiments using dogs as subjects were performed to test the usefulness of the protocol. The dogs were required to inhale trichloroethane. Breath and serum chemistry analyses were obtained and evaluated.3.A plausible theory for the source of the abnormal blood chemistry data is given based on autopsy data. © 1972.
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Rapid identification of and assessment of damage by inhaled volatile substances in the clinical laboratory
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Griffiths, W.C., Department of Pathology, The Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, United States
Lipsky, M., Department of Pathology, The Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, United States
Martin, H.F., Department of Pathology, The Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, United States

Rapid identification of and assessment of damage by inhaled volatile substances in the clinical laboratory
1.A protocol is presented by which inhaled volatile substances may be identified from breath samples. Further, the use of clinical laboratory data to assess the damage done by the inhaled substance is illustrated.2.Experiments using dogs as subjects were performed to test the usefulness of the protocol. The dogs were required to inhale trichloroethane. Breath and serum chemistry analyses were obtained and evaluated.3.A plausible theory for the source of the abnormal blood chemistry data is given based on autopsy data. © 1972.
Scientific Publication
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