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Wyatt, S.E., Department of Environmental and Plant Biology, Ohio University, Athens, United States
Sederoff, R., Forest Biotechnology Group, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, United States
Flaishman, M.A., Department of Fruit Trees, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Lev-Yadun, S., Department of Science Education-Biology, Faculty of Science and Science Education, University of Haifa-Oranim, Tivon, Israel
Trees and herbaceous plants continuously monitor their position to maintain vertical stem growth and regulate branch orientation. When orientation is altered from the vertical, they form a special type of wood called reaction wood that differs chemically and structurally from normal wood and forces reorientation of the organ or whole plant. The reaction wood of dicotyledons is called tension wood and is characterized by nonlignified gelatinous fibers. The altered chemical and mechanical properties of tension wood reduce wood quality and represent a major problem for the timber and pulping industries. Repeated clipping of the emerging inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana augments wood formation in organs, including those inflorescence stems that are allowed to develop later. Gravistimulation of such inflorescence stems induces tension wood formation, allowing the use of A. thaliana for a molecular and genetic analysis of the mechanisms of tension wood formation. © Pleiades Publishing, Ltd., 2010.
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Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for gelatinous fiber formation
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Wyatt, S.E., Department of Environmental and Plant Biology, Ohio University, Athens, United States
Sederoff, R., Forest Biotechnology Group, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, United States
Flaishman, M.A., Department of Fruit Trees, Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel
Lev-Yadun, S., Department of Science Education-Biology, Faculty of Science and Science Education, University of Haifa-Oranim, Tivon, Israel
Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for gelatinous fiber formation
Trees and herbaceous plants continuously monitor their position to maintain vertical stem growth and regulate branch orientation. When orientation is altered from the vertical, they form a special type of wood called reaction wood that differs chemically and structurally from normal wood and forces reorientation of the organ or whole plant. The reaction wood of dicotyledons is called tension wood and is characterized by nonlignified gelatinous fibers. The altered chemical and mechanical properties of tension wood reduce wood quality and represent a major problem for the timber and pulping industries. Repeated clipping of the emerging inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana augments wood formation in organs, including those inflorescence stems that are allowed to develop later. Gravistimulation of such inflorescence stems induces tension wood formation, allowing the use of A. thaliana for a molecular and genetic analysis of the mechanisms of tension wood formation. © Pleiades Publishing, Ltd., 2010.
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