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Luria, N., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Smith, E., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Reingold, V., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Bekelman, I., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Lapidot, M., Department of Vegetables and field crops, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Levin, I., Department of Vegetables and field crops, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Elad, N., Electron Microscopy Unit, Departments of Chemical Research Support, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Tam, Y., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Sela, N., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Abu-Ras, A., Plant Protection and Inspection Services, Beit-Dagan, Israel
Ezra, N., Plant Protection and Inspection Services, Beit-Dagan, Israel
Haberman, A., Plant Protection and Inspection Services, Beit-Dagan, Israel
Yitzhak, L., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel, Department of Plant Sciences, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Lachman, O., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Dombrovsky, A., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
An outbreak of a new disease infecting tomatoes occurred in October-November 2014 at the Ohad village in Southern Israel. Symptomatic plants showed a mosaic pattern on leaves accompanied occasionally by narrowing of leaves and yellow spotted fruit. The disease spread mechanically and rapidly reminiscent of tobamovirus infection. Epidemiological studies showed the spread of the disease in various growing areas, in the South and towards the Southeast and Northern parts of the country within a year. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed a single rod-like form characteristic to the Tobamovirus genus. We confirmed Koch's postulates for the disease followed by partial host range determination and revealed that tomato cultivars certified to harbor the Tm-22 resistance gene are susceptible to the new viral disease. We further characterized the viral source of the disease using a range of antisera for serological detection and analyzed various virus genera and families for cross-reactivity with the virus. In addition, next generation sequencing of total small RNA was performed on two cultivars grown in two different locations. In samples collected from commercial cultivars across Israel, we found a single virus that caused the disease. The complete genome sequence of the new Israeli tobamovirus showed high sequence identity to the Jordanian isolate of tomato brown rugose fruit virus. © 2017 Luria et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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A new israeli Tobamovirus isolate infects tomato plants harboring Tm-22 resistance genes
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Luria, N., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Smith, E., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Reingold, V., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Bekelman, I., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Lapidot, M., Department of Vegetables and field crops, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Levin, I., Department of Vegetables and field crops, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Elad, N., Electron Microscopy Unit, Departments of Chemical Research Support, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Tam, Y., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Sela, N., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Abu-Ras, A., Plant Protection and Inspection Services, Beit-Dagan, Israel
Ezra, N., Plant Protection and Inspection Services, Beit-Dagan, Israel
Haberman, A., Plant Protection and Inspection Services, Beit-Dagan, Israel
Yitzhak, L., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel, Department of Plant Sciences, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Lachman, O., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
Dombrovsky, A., Department of Plant Pathology, ARO, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel
A new israeli Tobamovirus isolate infects tomato plants harboring Tm-22 resistance genes
An outbreak of a new disease infecting tomatoes occurred in October-November 2014 at the Ohad village in Southern Israel. Symptomatic plants showed a mosaic pattern on leaves accompanied occasionally by narrowing of leaves and yellow spotted fruit. The disease spread mechanically and rapidly reminiscent of tobamovirus infection. Epidemiological studies showed the spread of the disease in various growing areas, in the South and towards the Southeast and Northern parts of the country within a year. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed a single rod-like form characteristic to the Tobamovirus genus. We confirmed Koch's postulates for the disease followed by partial host range determination and revealed that tomato cultivars certified to harbor the Tm-22 resistance gene are susceptible to the new viral disease. We further characterized the viral source of the disease using a range of antisera for serological detection and analyzed various virus genera and families for cross-reactivity with the virus. In addition, next generation sequencing of total small RNA was performed on two cultivars grown in two different locations. In samples collected from commercial cultivars across Israel, we found a single virus that caused the disease. The complete genome sequence of the new Israeli tobamovirus showed high sequence identity to the Jordanian isolate of tomato brown rugose fruit virus. © 2017 Luria et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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